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January 19, 2018 

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WORKERS' COMPENSATION: A government-run insurance program that provides benefits to workers injured on the job. Funding for these benefits come from premiums paid by employers. The federal government mandates the program, but it's administered by each of the states. This creates a great deal of diversity, with some states having good benefits and high premiums (sort of pro labor), while others have lousy benefits and low premiums (pro business). In addition to differences among states, premiums also differ based on a business's historical record of accidents. Those companies with a higher number of industrial accidents pay more in premiums than those with fewer accidents.

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Lesson Contents
Unit 1: Instability
  • What It Is
  • Fluctuations
  • Unit 1 Summary
  • Unit 2: Extension
  • Instability
  • Self-Correction
  • Unit 2 Summary
  • Unit 3: Basic Shifts
  • AD Shifts
  • AD Increase: Long Run
  • AD Decrease: Long Run
  • AD Increase: Short Run
  • AD Decrease: Short Run
  • Unit 3 Summary
  • Unit 4: Complex Shifts
  • AD
  • AD Increase
  • AD Decrease
  • SRAS
  • SRAS Increase
  • SRAS Decrease
  • Unit 4 Summary
  • Unit 5: Synthesis
  • Business Cycles
  • Unit 5 Summary
  • Course Home
    Aggregate Shocks

    In this lesson we use the aggregate market model to analyze assorted disruptions that cause shifts of the aggregate demand, short-run aggregate supply, and long-run aggregate supply curves. The reason for doing this, of course, is to explain and understand macroeconomic activity, especially business cycle instability that causes inflation and unemployment.

    • The first unit of this lesson reviews the aggregate market and examines how it is affected macroeconomic instability.
    • In the second unit, we take and look at assorted demands on both the demand side and supply side of the aggregate market that cause shorts to the aggregate market.
    • We then move into an analysis of six basic shifts involving increases and decreases in the aggregate demand, short-run aggregate supply, and long-run aggregate supply curves.
    • The fourth unit builds on these six basic shifts to examine four complex shifts in which recessionary and inflationary gaps trigger self-correction adjustments of the short-run aggregate supply.
    • We close out this lesson in the fifth with a thought or two on how the aggregate market can be used to explain business cycle fluctuations.

    BEGIN Lesson =>


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    TOTAL REVENUE CURVE, PERFECT COMPETITION

    A curve that graphically represents the relation between the total revenue received by a perfectly competitive firm for selling its output and the quantity of output sold. It is combined with a perfectly competitive firm's total cost curve to determine economic profit and the profit maximizing level of production. The slope of the total revenue curve is marginal revenue.

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    APLS

    ORANGE REBELOON
    [What's This?]

    Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time touring the new suburban shopping complex trying to buy either a set of luggage with wheels or a birthday gift for your aunt. Be on the lookout for fairy dust that tastes like salt.
    Your Complete Scope

    This isn't me! What am I?

    The first paper currency used in North America was pasteboard playing cards "temporarily" authorized as money by the colonial governor of French Canada, awaiting "real money" from France.
    "You are never given a dream without also being given the power to make it true."

    -- Richard Bach, Author

    AS
    Aggregate Supply
    A PEDestrian's Guide
    Xtra Credit
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