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January 17, 2018 

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JOB: Specific employment activities associated with a production process that are usually undertaken by a single worker. For example, someone might have the job of serving food or repairing cars. Others might have the job of teaching economics. The word "job" is the primary designation applied to a worker when hired by an employer. It is commonly used as a modifier for other terms, such as job satisfaction or job security, as reference to specific aspects of working or employment.

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Lesson Contents
Unit 1: Selling Basics
  • The Concept
  • Supply Price
  • Quantity Supplied
  • Unit 1 Summary
  • Unit 2: Law of Supply
  • Definition
  • Production Cost
  • Unit 2 Summary
  • Unit 3: Supply Curve
  • Schedule
  • Curve
  • Space
  • Unit 3 Summary
  • Unit 4: Determinants
  • Ceteris Paribus Factors
  • Shifters: Increase
  • Shifters: Decrease
  • Types
  • Ch..Ch..Changes
  • Unit 4 Summary
  • Unit 5: Scarcity
  • Limited Resources
  • Unit 5 Summary
  • Unit 6:
  • Unit 6 Summary
  • Course Home
    Supply

    This supply lesson provides an introduction into selling a wide range of goods. In fact, this supply topic does more than offer insight into selling behavior. It's also the second half of the market analysis -- the first half being demand. And to reiterate what I noted during the demand lesson, market analysis is one of the most widely used tools in the study of economics that can be used to explain a lot of economic phenomenon. Of course to use markets, we need both demand and supply. And supply part is our current lesson.

    • The first unit of this lesson introduces the basic concept of supply and a few related terms such as supply price and quantity supplied.
    • In the second unit then we move into a discussion of the law of supply, which captures the basic relation between supply price and quantity supplied.
    • The third unit then develops the supply curve, which is the graphical embodiment of the supply concept.
    • Moving onto the fourth unit, we examine how the five basic supply determinants cause the supply curve to shift from one location to another.
    • And in the fifth and final unit, we make a connection between supply and the limited resources part of scarcity.

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    ALLOCATION EFFECT

    A change in the allocation of resources caused by placing taxes on economic activity. By creating disincentives to produce, consume, or exchange, taxes generally alter resource allocations. The allocation effect is typically used when governments seek to discourage the production, consumption, or exchange of particular goods or activities that are deemed undesirable (such as tobacco use or pollution). This is one of two effects of taxation. The other (primary) is the revenue effect, which is the generation of revenue used to finance government operations.

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    Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time watching the shopping channel looking to buy either decorative picture frames or storage boxes for your income tax returns. Be on the lookout for cardboard boxes.
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    Two and a half gallons of oil are needed to produce one automobile tire.
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