Google
Tuesday 
October 16, 2018 

AmosWEB means Economics with a Touch of Whimsy!

AmosWEBWEB*pediaGLOSS*aramaECON*worldCLASS*portalQUIZ*tasticPED GuideXtra CrediteTutorA*PLS
FACTOR SUPPLY CURVE: A graphical representation of the relation between the price to a factor of production and quantity of the factor supplied, holding all ceteris paribus factor supply determinants constant. The factor supply curve is one half of the factor market. The other half is the factor demand curve. The factor supply curve indicates the quantity of a factor that would be supplied at alternative factor prices. While all factors of production, or scarce resources, including labor, capital, land, and entrepreneurship, have factor supply curves, labor is the factor most often analyzed. Like other supply curves, the factor supply curve is generally positively sloped. Higher factor prices are associated with larger quantities supplied and lower factor prices go with smaller quantities supplied.

Visit the GLOSS*arama

Most Viewed (Number) Visit the WEB*pedia

Lesson 15: Aggregate Market | Unit 4: Self Correction Page: 19 of 22

Topic: Summary <=PAGE BACK | PAGE NEXT=>

  • How the short-run equilibrium creates an imbalance in the labor market that leads to self-correction of the aggregate market to the long-run equilibrium.
  • How the aggregate market adjusts to full employment automatically, with shifts of the short-run aggregate supply curve to eliminate a recessionary gap.
  • How the aggregate market adjusts to full employment automatically, with shifts of the short-run aggregate supply curve to eliminate a inflationary gap.

Course Home | Lesson Menu | Page Back | Page Next

FEDERAL DEFICIT, AGGREGATE DEMAND DETERMINANT

One of several specific aggregate demand determinants assumed constant when the aggregate demand curve is constructed, and that shifts the aggregate demand curve when it changes. An increase in the federal deficit causes an increase (rightward shift) of the aggregate curve. A decrease in the federal deficit causes a decrease (leftward shift) of the aggregate curve. Other notable aggregate demand determinants are interest rates, inflationary expectations, and the money supply.

Complete Entry | Visit the WEB*pedia


APLS

PURPLE SMARPHIN
[What's This?]

Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time wandering around the downtown area trying to buy either a pair of blue silicon oven mitts or a coffee cup commemorating the 2000 Olympics. Be on the lookout for mail order catalogs with hidden messages.
Your Complete Scope

This isn't me! What am I?

Ragnar Frisch and Jan Tinbergen were the 1st Nobel Prize winners in Economics in 1969.
"Success is more a function of consistent common sense than it is of genius. "

-- An Wang, industrialist

ATM
Automated Teller Machine
A PEDestrian's Guide
Xtra Credit
Tell us what you think about AmosWEB. Like what you see? Have suggestions for improvements? Let us know. Click the User Feedback link.

User Feedback



| AmosWEB | WEB*pedia | GLOSS*arama | ECON*world | CLASS*portal | QUIZ*tastic | PED Guide | Xtra Credit | eTutor | A*PLS |
| About Us | Terms of Use | Privacy Statement |

Thanks for visiting AmosWEB
Copyright ©2000-2018 AmosWEB*LLC
Send comments or questions to: WebMaster