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ARBITRAGE: Buying something in one market then immediately (or as soon as possible) selling it in another market for (hopefully) a higher price. Arbitrage is a common practice in financial markets. For example, an aspiring financial tycoon might buy a million dollars worth of Japanese yen in the Tokyo foreign exchange market then resell it immediately in the New York foreign exchange market for more than a million dollars. Arbitrage of this sort does two things. First, it often makes arbitragers wealthy. Second, it reduces or eliminates price differences that exist between two markets for the same good.

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Lesson 17: Money | Unit 3: Monetary Aggregates Page: 16 of 25

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  • The concept and definition of M1, which is the sum of currency and coins held by the non-bank public, and checkable deposits.
  • That credit cards are not part of M1, they are not money.
  • That M2 is a broader measure of money that includes M1 plus what we can call near money, that is, temporary savings, a pool of funds that can be accessed quickly and easily.
  • That near monies are savings and that there are several different types of savings: standard savings accounts, certificates of deposit (CDs), money market funds, overnight Eurodollars and overnight repurchase agreements.
  • M3 is equal to M2 plus other near monies which include larger denomination certificates of deposit and longer-term repurchase agreements.
  • Liquid assets L, are the economy's total financial assets that can be converted to M1.

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AVERAGE FACTOR COST CURVE

A curve that graphically represents the relation between average factor cost incurred by a firm for employing an input and the quantity of input used. Because average factor cost is essentially the price of the input, the average factor cost curve is also the supply curve for the input. The average factor cost curve for a firm with no market control is horizontal. The average revenue curve for a firm with market control is positively sloped.

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