Google
Wednesday 
April 25, 2018 

AmosWEB means Economics with a Touch of Whimsy!

AmosWEBWEB*pediaGLOSS*aramaECON*worldCLASS*portalQUIZ*tasticPED GuideXtra CrediteTutorA*PLS
BANK RESERVES: The "money" that banks use to conduct day-to-day business, including cashing checks, satisfying customers's withdrawals, and clearing checks between accounts at different banks. The "money" in question includes vault cash and Federal Reserve deposits. Specifically, vault cash is the paper money and coins that a bank keeps on the bank premises (both in the vault and in teller drawers), which is used to "cash" checks and otherwise provide the funds that customers withdraw. Federal Reserve deposits are accounts that banks keep with the Federal Reserve System, which are used to process, in a systematic, centralized fashion, the millions of checks written each day by customers of one bank that are deposited by customers of another bank. Using these deposits, the Fed acts as a central clearing house for checks, being able to simultaneously debit the account of one bank and credit the account of another. More on the importance of bank reserves can be found under fractional-reserve banking.

Visit the GLOSS*arama

Most Viewed (Number) Visit the WEB*pedia

Lesson 5: Demand | Unit 4: Determinants Page: 18 of 20

Topic: Summary <=PAGE BACK | PAGE NEXT=>

  • Why relaxing the ceteris paribus assumption enables further analysis of demand and markets.
  • How the changes in the demand determinants cause rightward or leftward shifts in the demand curve.
  • The five basic demand determinants: income, preferences, prices of other goods, buyers' expectations, and number of buyers.
  • How income affects the demand for normal goods differently than inferior goods.
  • How a change in the price of a substitute goods affects demand differently than a change in the price of a complement good.
  • Most important of all, the difference between a change in demand, caused by a change in a demand determinant, and a change in quantity demanded, caused by a change in price.


Course Home | Lesson Menu | Page Back | Page Next

LAW OF SUPPLY

The direct relationship between supply price and the quantity supplied, assuming ceteris paribus factors are held constant. This economic principle indicates that an increase in the price of a commodity results in an increase in the quantity of the commodity that sellers are willing and able to sell in a given period of time, if other factors are held constant. The law of supply is an important principle in the study of economics.

Complete Entry | Visit the WEB*pedia


APLS

ORANGE REBELOON
[What's This?]

Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time looking for a downtown retail store trying to buy either a case of blank recordable DVDs or a pair of red goulashes with shiny buckles. Be on the lookout for slightly overweight pizza delivery guys.
Your Complete Scope

This isn't me! What am I?

Cyrus McCormick not only invented the reaper for harvesting grain, he also invented the installment payment for selling his reaper.
"The greatest things ever done on Earth have been done little by little. "

-- William Jennings Bryan

DTI
Department of Trade and Industry (UK)
A PEDestrian's Guide
Xtra Credit
Tell us what you think about AmosWEB. Like what you see? Have suggestions for improvements? Let us know. Click the User Feedback link.

User Feedback



| AmosWEB | WEB*pedia | GLOSS*arama | ECON*world | CLASS*portal | QUIZ*tastic | PED Guide | Xtra Credit | eTutor | A*PLS |
| About Us | Terms of Use | Privacy Statement |

Thanks for visiting AmosWEB
Copyright ©2000-2018 AmosWEB*LLC
Send comments or questions to: WebMaster