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BEAR MARKET: A condition of the stock market in which stock prices are generally declining and most of the participants expect this decline to continue. In other words, the stock market is into an extended period of "hibernation" that could last for months or even years. This isn't the same as a "crash" of falling stock prices over a short time (like one day). A bear market usually occurs because investors see a sluggish, stagnant economy with few signs of robust growth.

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Lesson 6: Supply | Unit 2: Law of Supply Page: 5 of 19

Topic: Definition <=PAGE BACK | PAGE NEXT=>

The law of supply is the basic principle underlying supply.

A definition:

The law of supply is a direct relationship between supply price and the quantity supplied, ceteris paribus.

  • Direct relationship means that people sell more of a good if the price is higher and less if the price is lower.
  • The law of supply is not as rigid as the law of demand. The price and the quantity supplied are not always directly related. Higher prices could cause an increase or a decrease in the quantity supplied.
Ceteris paribus is also important to the law of supply.
  • Ceteris paribus means other things remain unchanged.
  • Law of supply applies exclusively to the relationship between supply price and quantity supplied.
  • All other things that can affect supply must remain constant to avoid distorting this relationship.
  • Because supply is affected by many factors other than price, the price/quantity supply relationship can get lost when other things change.
  • Other factors that affect supply are called supply determinants.

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AVERAGE REVENUE PRODUCT AND MARGINAL REVENUE PRODUCT

A mathematical connection between average revenue product and marginal revenue product stating that the change in the average revenue product depends on a comparison between the average revenue product and marginal revenue product. If marginal revenue product is less than average revenue product, then average revenue product declines. If marginal revenue product is greater than average revenue product, then average revenue product rises. If marginal revenue product is equal to average revenue product, then average revenue product does not change.

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