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M: The standard abbreviation for imports produced by the domestic economy and purchased by the foreign sector, especially when used in the study of macroeconomics. This abbreviation is most often seen in the aggregate expenditure equation, AE = C + I + G + (X - M), where C, I, G, and (X - M) represent expenditures by the four macroeconomic sectors, household, business, government, and foreign. The United States, for example, buys a lot of the stuff produced within the boundaries of other countries, including bananas, coffee, cars, chocolate, computers, and, well, a lot of other products. Imports, together with exports, are the essence of foreign trade--goods and services that are traded among the citizens of different nations. Imports and exports are frequently combined into a single term, net exports (exports minus imports).

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Lesson 1: Economic Basics | Unit 5: Policies Page: 16 of 18

Topic: Problems <=PAGE BACK | PAGE NEXT=>

Several problems prevent market deficiencies from being efficiently corrected by government action.

Government imperfections:

  • Voter Apathy: When people don't vote, leaders don't know what the public really wants.
  • Special Interest Groups: Those with influence, can adversely affect government policies.
  • Re-election Minded Politicians: Leaders who please only a few, won't represent everyone.
  • Complex Bureaucracies: Complexity keeps public workers from being responsible for their actions.

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MARGINAL PRODUCTIVITY THEORY

A theory used to analyze the profit-maximizing quantity of inputs (that is, the services of factor of productions) purchased by a firm in the production of output. Marginal-productivity theory indicates that the demand for a factor of production is based on the marginal product of the factor. In particular, a firm is generally willing to pay a higher price for an input that is more productive and contributes more to output. The demand for an input is thus best termed a derived demand.

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APLS

GREEN LOGIGUIN
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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time searching for a specialty store seeking to buy either a wall poster commemorating last Friday (you know why) or a country wreathe. Be on the lookout for malfunctioning pocket calculators.
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Before 1933, the U.S. dime was legal as payment only in transactions of $10 or less.
"The greatest barrier to success is the fear of failure."

-- Sven Goran Eriksson, writer

CPI-W
Consumer Price Index-Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers
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