March 23, 2018 

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RISK AVERSE: A person who values a certain income more than an equal amount of income that involves risk or uncertainty. To illustrate, let's say that you're given two options--(A) a guaranteed $1,000 or (b) a 50-50 chance of getting either $500 or $1,500. If you chose option A, then you're risk averse. Both options give you the same "expected" values. In other words, if you select option B a few hundred times, then your average amount over those few hundred times is $1,000.

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BROOKINGS INSTITUTION: An independent, nonpartisan organization devoted to research, analysis, education, and publication focused on public policy issues in the areas of economics, foreign policy, and governance. The Brookings Institution takes its name from Somers Brookings (1850-1932) who in 1922 and 1924 founded the Institute of Economics and a graduate school bearing his name. These two institutions and the Institute for Government Research (IGR), which was the first private organization devoted to analyzing public policy issues at the national level, merged in 1927 to create the Brookings Institution. The Brookings Institution is a non-profit organization located in Washington, D.C.

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A disequilibrium condition in a competitive market that has a shortage or excess demand. Because the quantity demanded is greater than the quantity supplied, sellers have the "upper hand" when negotiating. A sellers' market also goes by the more common term of shortage. The alternative to a sellers' market is a buyers' market, which has a surplus or excess supply.

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During the American Revolution, the price of corn rose 10,000 percent, the price of wheat 14,000 percent, the price of flour 15,000 percent, and the price of beef 33,000 percent.
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