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NATIONAL INDUSTRIAL RECOVERY ACT: One of the first acts passed under New Deal program the Roosevelt administration in 1933, it specifically allowed workers to organized into unions and to engage in collective bargaining without interference from firms. This act, going by the acronym NIRA, was declared unconstitutional in 1935, but while in force gave a big boost to labor unions and membership. The National Labor Relations Act was created in 1935 to replace the NIRA.

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CATO INSTITUTE: A public policy research foundation that contributes to the public policy debate inspired by the principles of limited government, individual liberty, free markets, and peace. The Institute is named for Cato's Letters, which are 144 libertarian essays written by John Trenchard and Thomas Gordon and first published from 1720 to 1723, condemning tyranny and advancing principles of liberty. These two Englishmen were inspired by Cato the Younger (95-46 B.C.) a Roman statesman who had of the reputation for honesty and incorruptibility in ancient times. The Cato Institute is a non-profit organization founded in 1977 by Edward H. Crane and is headquartered in Washington, D.C.

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ALLOCATION EFFECT

A change in the allocation of resources caused by placing taxes on economic activity. By creating disincentives to produce, consume, or exchange, taxes generally alter resource allocations. The allocation effect is typically used when governments seek to discourage the production, consumption, or exchange of particular goods or activities that are deemed undesirable (such as tobacco use or pollution). This is one of two effects of taxation. The other (primary) is the revenue effect, which is the generation of revenue used to finance government operations.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time at a flea market trying to buy either a 200-foot blue garden hose or a video camera with stop action features. Be on the lookout for telephone calls from long-lost relatives.
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The word "fiscal" is derived from a Latin word meaning "moneybag."
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