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DISCRETIONARY POLICY: Government policies that involve explicit actions designed to achieve specific goals. A common type of discretionary policy is that designed to stabilize business cycles, reduce unemployment, and lower inflation, through government spending and taxes (fiscal policy) or the money supply (monetary policy). Discretionary policies are also termed activist policies because they involve active decisions by government. A contrast to discretionary policy is automatic stabilizers that help stabilize business cycles without explicit government actions.

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CAPITAL ACCOUNT DEFICIT: An imbalance in a nation's balance of payments capital account in which payments made by the country for purchasing foreign assets exceed payments received by the country for selling domestic assets. In other words, investment by the domestic economy in foreign assets is less than foreign investment in domestic assets. This is generally not a desireable situation for a domestic economy. However, in the wacky world of international economics, a capital account deficit is often balanced by a current account surplus, which is generally considered a desireable situation. If, however, the current account does not balance out the capital account, then a capital account deficit contributes to a balance of payments deficit.

     See also | capital account | balance of payments | balance of payments deficit | capital account surplus | current account | current account surplus | domestic | foreign | international economics | international finance | foreign exchange |


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AGGREGATE EXPENDITURES LINE

A graphical depiction of the relation between aggregate expenditures by the four macroeconomic sectors (household, business, government, and foreign) and the level of aggregate income or production. In Keynesian economics, the aggregate expenditures line is the essential component of the Keynesian cross analysis used to identify equilibrium income and production. Like any straight line, the aggregate expenditures line is characterized by vertical intercept, which indicates autonomous expenditures, and slope, which indicates induced expenditures. The aggregate expenditures line used in Keynesian economics is derived by adding or stacking investment, government purchases, and net exports to the consumption line.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time wandering around the downtown area wanting to buy either one of those memory foam pillows or a remote controlled train set. Be on the lookout for fairy dust that tastes like salt.
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Francis Bacon (1561-1626), a champion of the scientific method, died when he caught a severe cold while attempting to preserve a chicken by filling it with snow.
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