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MARGINAL COST CURVE: A curve that graphically represents the relation between marginal cost incurred by a firm in the short-run product of a good or service and the quantity of output produced. This curve is constructed to capture the relation between marginal cost and the level of output, holding other variables, like technology and resource prices, constant. The marginal cost curve is U-shaped. Marginal cost is relatively high at small quantities of output, then as production increases, declines, reaches a minimum value, then rises. This shape of the marginal cost curve is directly attributable to increasing, then decreasing marginal returns (and the law of diminishing marginal returns).

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CONSUMER EQUILIBRIUM: The condition that exists when the last dollar spent on one good provides the same marginal utility as the last dollar spent on every other good. In consumer equilibrium, you allocate income between the purchase of different goods in such a way that you cannot increase your level of utility, that is, you have achieved utility maximization. In indifference curve analysis, this occurs where the budget line is tangent to the highest reachable indifference curve. With this consumption bundle, the ratio of prices is equal to the ratio of marginal utilities. This means that the willingness of the consumer to trade one good for the other is exactly the same as the ability to trade the two goods in the market.

     See also | marginal utility | utility | consumer demand theory | utility maximization | budget line | indifference curve |


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CONSUMER EQUILIBRIUM, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2018. [Accessed: December 18, 2018].


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AGGREGATE DEMAND INCREASE, SHORT-RUN AGGREGATE MARKET

A shock to the short-run aggregate market caused by an increase in aggregate demand, resulting in and illustrated by a rightward shift of the aggregate demand curve. An increase in aggregate demand in the short-run aggregate market results in an increase in the price level and an increase in real production. The level of real production resulting from the shock can be greater or less than full-employment real production.

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