Google
Thursday 
June 21, 2018 

AmosWEB means Economics with a Touch of Whimsy!

AmosWEBWEB*pediaGLOSS*aramaECON*worldCLASS*portalQUIZ*tasticPED GuideXtra CrediteTutorA*PLS
SHERMAN ACT: The first antitrust law passed in the United States in 1890 that outlawed monopoly or any attempts to monopolize a market. This was one of three major antitrust laws passed in the late 1800s and early 1900s. The other two were the Clayton Act and the Federal Trade Commission Act. The Sherman Act was successfully used to break up several noted monopolies in the early 1900s, including the Standard Oil Trust in 1911. However, it was flawed by (1) vague wording that allowed wide interpretation (especially based on political influence) and (2) the lack of an effective means of enforcement other than an extended journey through the court system. These two flaws led to the Federal Trade Commission Act and Clayton Act, both passed in 1914. Although other laws have been passed, the Sherman Act remains the cornerstone of antitrust laws in the United States.

Visit the GLOSS*arama

Most Viewed (Number) Visit the WEB*pedia

DERIVATION, CONSUMPTION LINE: A consumption line, a graphical depiction of the relation between household sector consumption and income, can be derived from a simple consumption schedule, a table or chart showing the relation between household sector consumption and income. This is easily accomplished by plotting the consumption-income pairs from the schedule as points in a diagram that measures consumption on the vertical axis and income on the horizontal axis, then connection the points with a line. The consumption line can also be derived directly by plotting the consumption function using slope and intercept values.

     See also | consumption schedule | consumption line | consumption function | induced consumption | autonomous consumption | average propensity to consume | marginal propensity to consume | saving line | derivation, saving line | slope, consumption line | intercept, consumption line | effective demand | psychological law | consumption | consumption expenditures | Keynesian economics | macroeconomics | household sector | disposable income | national income | personal consumption expenditures | induced expenditures | autonomous expenditures | aggregate expenditures | derivation, aggregate expenditures line | aggregate expenditures line | consumption expenditures determinants | Keynesian model | Keynesian equilibrium | injections-leakages model | aggregate demand | paradox of thrift | fiscal policy | multiplier |


Recommended Citation:

DERIVATION, CONSUMPTION LINE, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2018. [Accessed: June 21, 2018].


AmosWEB Encyclonomic WEB*pedia:

Additional information on this term can be found at:

WEB*pedia: derivation, consumption line

Search Again?

Back to the GLOSS*arama

AGGREGATE DEMAND DETERMINANTS

An assortment of ceteris paribus factors other than the price level that affect aggregate demand, but which are assumed constant when the aggregate demand curve is constructed. Changes in any of the aggregate demand determinants cause the aggregate demand curve to shift. The specific ceteris paribus factors are commonly grouped by the four, broad expenditure categories--consumption expenditures, investment expenditures, government purchases, and net exports.

Complete Entry | Visit the WEB*pedia


APLS

PINK FADFLY
[What's This?]

Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time at a garage sale hoping to buy either a New York Yankees baseball cap or a solid oak entertainment center. Be on the lookout for telephone calls from long-lost relatives.
Your Complete Scope

This isn't me! What am I?

Francis Bacon (1561-1626), a champion of the scientific method, died when he caught a severe cold while attempting to preserve a chicken by filling it with snow.
"Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new. "

-- Albert Einstein, physicist

AOQL
Average Outgoing Quality Limit
A PEDestrian's Guide
Xtra Credit
Tell us what you think about AmosWEB. Like what you see? Have suggestions for improvements? Let us know. Click the User Feedback link.

User Feedback



| AmosWEB | WEB*pedia | GLOSS*arama | ECON*world | CLASS*portal | QUIZ*tastic | PED Guide | Xtra Credit | eTutor | A*PLS |
| About Us | Terms of Use | Privacy Statement |

Thanks for visiting AmosWEB
Copyright ©2000-2018 AmosWEB*LLC
Send comments or questions to: WebMaster