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PRICE CONTROLS: Government intervention in markets in which legal restrictions are placed on the prices charged. The two basic types of price controls are price ceilings and price floors. Price ceilings are maximum prices set below the equilibrium price. Price floors are minimum prices set above the equilibrium price. Price controls imposed on an otherwise efficient and competitive market create imbalances (shortages or surpluses) which cause inefficiency. However, imposing price controls on a market that fails to achieve efficiency (due to market control, externalities, or imperfect information) can actual improve efficiency. Price controls have also be used economy-wide in an attempt to reduce inflation.

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FOUR-SECTOR KEYNESIAN MODEL: A model used to identify equilibrium in Keynesian economics based on aggregate expenditures by all four sectors (household, business, government, and foreign). Equilibrium is achieved at the intersection of the aggregate expenditures line, AE = C + I + G + (X - M), and the 45-degree line, Y = AE. This is the complete Keynesian aggregate expenditures model can be used to analyzed the impact of the foreign sector on aggregate expenditures and equilibrium.

     See also | Keynesian economics | Keynesian equilibrium | consumption line | aggregate expenditures line | 45-degree line | household sector | business sector | government sector | foreign sector | fiscal policy | two-sector Keynesian model | three-sector Keynesian model |


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PARADOX OF THRIFT

The notion that an increase in saving, which is generally good advice for an individual during bad economic times, can actually worsen the macroeconomy causing a reduction in aggregate income, production, and paradoxically a decrease in saving. The paradox of thrift is an example of the fallacy of composition stating that what is true for the part is not necessarily true for the whole.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time browsing about a thrift store trying to buy either a coffee cup commemorating the first day of spring or a printer that works with your stockpile of ink cartridges. Be on the lookout for slightly overweight pizza delivery guys.
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Only 1% of the U.S. population paid income taxes when the income tax was established in 1914.
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