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ECONOMIES OF SCALE: Declining long-run average cost that occurs as a firm increases all inputs and expands its scale of production. This is graphically illustrated by a negatively-sloped long-run average cost curve and typically occurs for relatively small levels of production. Economies of scale are then overwhelmed by diseconomies of scale for relatively large production levels. Together, economies of scale and diseconomies of scale cause the long-run average cost curve to be U-shaped.

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GOVERNMENT SUBSIDIES LESS CURRENT SURPLUS OF GOVERNMENT ENTERPRISES: The difference between transfer payments from the government sector to the business sector and "profit" received by government-operated "firms." This composite item is one of several differences between national income (the resource cost of production) and gross (and net) domestic product (the market value of production) in the National Income and Product Accounts maintained by the Bureau of Economic Analysis. This item tends to be relatively small, invariably less than 1 percent of gross domestic product.

     See also | national income and gross domestic product | national income and net domestic product | government subsidies | current surplus of government enterprises | government enterprises | capital consumption adjustment | indirect business taxes | net foreign factor income | business transfer payments | statistical discrepancy | national income | gross domestic product | gross domestic product, income | production | product markets | National Income and Product Accounts | Bureau of Economic Analysis | National Bureau of Economic Research | factor payments | circular flow | business cycles | gross domestic product, expenditures | gross domestic product, ins and outs | gross domestic product, welfare | gross national product | real gross domestic product | government functions | net domestic product | personal income | disposable income | gross domestic income | profit |


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GOVERNMENT SUBSIDIES LESS CURRENT SURPLUS OF GOVERNMENT ENTERPRISES, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2018. [Accessed: September 22, 2018].


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FACTOR DEMAND ELASTICITY

The elasticity of a factor demand curve is affected by four items: (1) the price elasticity of demand for the good produced, (2) the production function technology and elasticity of marginal physical product, (3) the ease of factor substitutability, and (4) the share of the factor's cost relative to total cost. Changes in any of these four items cause the price elasticity of factor demand to change. In other words, the quantity of factor services demanded becomes more or less sensitive to changes in the factor price.

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