March 20, 2018 

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NEAR-PUBLIC GOOD: A good that's easy to keep nonpayers from consuming, but use of the good by one person doesn't prevent use by others. The trick with a near-public good is that it's easy to keep people away, and thus you can charge them a price for consuming, but there's no real good reason to do so. From an efficiency view, the more people who consume a near-public good, the better off society. This mixture of nearly unlimited benefits and the ability to charge a price means that some near-public goods are sold through markets and others are provided by government. For efficiency's sake, none should be sold through markets.

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INTERSECTION: In a graph the point at which two lines cross. In a more sophisticate mathematical view, the combination of two variables that simultaneously satisfy two separate relations. The most common intersection in economics involves the demand and supply curves. The equilibrium price and equilibrium quantity are the two variables that simultaneously satisfy the demand and supply relations (law of demand and law of supply). Most graphical intersection points are worth noting in the study of economics. More often than not an intersection point is also an equilibrium.

     See also | graph | curve | variable | market | demand | supply | equilibrium price | equilibrium quantity |

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The relative response of one variable to changes in another variable. Elasticity is commonly used in the study of market exchanges to identify the relative response of quantity (demanded and supplied) to changes in price. The phrase "relative response" is best interpreted as the percentage change, such as, the percentage change in quantity measured against the percentage change in price. The most common notions of elasticity are the price elasticity of demand and the price elasticity of supply. Other notable economic elasticities are the income elasticity of demand and the cross elasticity of demand.

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Junk bonds are so called because they have a better than 50% chance of default, carrying a Standard & Poor's rating of CC or lower.
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