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December 4, 2016 

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EQUILIBRIUM: The state that exists when opposing forces exactly offset each other and there is no inherent tendency for change. Once achieved, an equilibrium persists unless or until it is disrupted by an outside force.

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LAW OF COMPARATIVE ADVANTAGE: A basic principle that states every nation has a production activity that incurs a lower opportunity cost than that of another nation, which means that trade between the two nations can be beneficial to both if each specializes in the production of a good with lower relative opportunity cost. While this law is fundamental to the study of international trade, it also applies to other activities, especially the specialization and the division of labor.

     See also | international economics | comparative advantage | absolute advantage | international trade | opportunity cost | specialization | division of labor | foreign sector | domestic sector | foreign trade | closed economy | open economy | exports | imports | net exports |


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LAW OF COMPARATIVE ADVANTAGE, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2016. [Accessed: December 4, 2016].


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REAL-BALANCE EFFECT

A change in aggregate expenditures on real production made by the household, business, government, and foreign sectors that results because a change in the price level alters the purchasing power of money. This is one of three effects underlying the negative slope of the aggregate demand curve associated with a movement along the aggregate demand curve and a change in aggregate expenditures. The other two are interest-rate effect and net-export effect. The real-balance effect is somewhat analogous to the income effect underlying the negative slope of the market demand curve.

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$87.5 billion
Up 0.9% from 2nd Quarter 2015 US Census Bureau

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time going from convenience store to convenience store hoping to buy either income tax software or a how-to book on the art of negotiation. Be on the lookout for rusty deck screws.
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The first paper currency used in North America was pasteboard playing cards "temporarily" authorized as money by the colonial governor of French Canada, awaiting "real money" from France.
"Wise men speak because they have something to say; Fools because they have to say something. "

-- Plato, philosopher

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