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September 30, 2014 

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WILLINGNESS TO ACCEPT: The price or dollar amount that someone is willing to receive or accept to give up a good or service. Willingness to accept is the source of the supply price of a good. However, unlike supply price, in which sellers are on the spot of actually giving up a good to receive payment, willingness to accept does not require an actual exchange. This concept is important to benefit-cost analysis, welfare economics, and efficiency criteria, especially Kaldor-Hicks efficiency. A related concept is willingness to pay.

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LAW OF COMPARATIVE ADVANTAGE: A basic principle that states every nation has a production activity that incurs a lower opportunity cost than that of another nation, which means that trade between the two nations can be beneficial to both if each specializes in the production of a good with lower relative opportunity cost. While this law is fundamental to the study of international trade, it also applies to other activities, especially the specialization and the division of labor.

     See also | international economics | comparative advantage | absolute advantage | international trade | opportunity cost | specialization | division of labor | foreign sector | domestic sector | foreign trade | closed economy | open economy | exports | imports | net exports |


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LAW OF COMPARATIVE ADVANTAGE, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2014. [Accessed: September 30, 2014].


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MARGINAL FACTOR COST

The change in total factor cost resulting from a change in the quantity of factor input employed by a firm. Marginal factor cost, abbreviated MFC, indicates how total factor cost changes with the employment of one more input. It is found by dividing the change in total factor cost by the change in the quantity of input used. Marginal factor cost is compared with marginal revenue product to identify the profit-maximizing quantity of input to hire.

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