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April 30, 2016 

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POLLUTION: Any waste that imposes an opportunity cost when it's returned to the natural environment. Pollution is one of the more prevalent examples of an externality cost and market failure. Examples include, but by no means are limited to, car exhaust, municipal sewage, industrial waste, and agricultural chemical runoff from farms. Pollution waste can be classified as degradable, persistent, or nondegradable, depending on how easily it can be broken down into nonharmful form by the natural environment. Pollution problems can never be eliminated, but they can be handled with efficiency if the amount of pollution is such that the cost of damages is the same as the cost of cleanup.

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MARKET CLEARING: The price and quantity that equates the quantity demanded and quantity supplied; equates the demand price and supply price; and achieves market equilibrium. In other words, the market is "cleared" of shortages and surpluses.

     See also | quantity demanded | quantity supplied | shortage | surplus | market equilibrium | equilibrium price | equilibrium quantity | market disequilibrium |


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AGGREGATE DEMAND INCREASE, SHORT-RUN AGGREGATE MARKET

A shock to the short-run aggregate market caused by an increase in aggregate demand, resulting in and illustrated by a rightward shift of the aggregate demand curve. An increase in aggregate demand in the short-run aggregate market results in an increase in the price level and an increase in real production. The level of real production resulting from the shock can be greater or less than full-employment real production.

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APLS

State of the ECONOMY

Productivity
3rd Quarter 2015
Up 2.2% from 2nd Quarter 2015
Source: BLS

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BEIGE MUNDORTLE
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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time searching for rummage sales wanting to buy either a T-shirt commemorating the 2000 Olympics or a genuine fake plastic Tiffany lamp. Be on the lookout for telephone calls from former employers.
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A lump of pure gold the size of a matchbox can be flattened into a sheet the size of a tennis court!
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