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MARGINAL PROPENSITY TO SAVE: The proportion of each additional dollar of household income that is used for saving. Or alternatively, this is the change in saving due to a change in disposable income. Abbreviated MPS, the marginal propensity to save is the slope of the saving or propensity-to-save line. It also takes center stage for the multiplier effect. In particular, the inverse of the MPS is the simple expenditure multiplier. The sum of the marginal propensity to save and the related concept, the marginal propensity to consume, is equal to one.

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PARADOX OF THRIFT: The notion that an increase in saving, which is prudent for an individual during bad economic times, is not the best course of action for the macroeconomy. If total saving in the economy increases, then consumption and aggregate expenditures decline, which causes a decline in aggregate output.

     See also | saving | consumption expenditures | contraction | business cycle | multiplier | aggregate expenditures | aggregate output |


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PARADOX OF THRIFT, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2014. [Accessed: July 23, 2014].


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AGGREGATE DEMAND SHIFTS

Changes in the aggregate demand determinants cause the aggregate demand curve to shift. The mechanism is comparable to that for market demand determinants and market demand. There are two alternatives--an increase in aggregate demand and a decrease in aggregate demand. An increase in spending by any of the four sectors--household, business, government, and foreign--shifts the aggregate demand curve to right. A decrease in spending by these four sectors shifts the aggregate demand curve to left.

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New Orders for Manufactured Goods
April 2014
$499.8 billion
Up 0.7% from March 2014 Econ & Statistics Adm

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During the American Revolution, the price of corn rose 10,000 percent, the price of wheat 14,000 percent, the price of flour 15,000 percent, and the price of beef 33,000 percent.
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