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April 16, 2014 

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REFERENCE WEEK: The calendar week (Sunday through Saturday) containing the 12th day of the month, which is used in the Current Population Survey (CPS) as the time period for documenting the employment and labor force status of respondents. The estimation of the unemployment rate and other employment information generated by the CPS are based on activities of survey respondents during this week. The actual survey is conducted by interviewers working for the Bureau of the Census during the calendar week containing the 19th day, which is termed the survey week.

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PARADOX OF THRIFT: The notion that an increase in saving, which is prudent for an individual during bad economic times, is not the best course of action for the macroeconomy. If total saving in the economy increases, then consumption and aggregate expenditures decline, which causes a decline in aggregate output.

     See also | saving | consumption expenditures | contraction | business cycle | multiplier | aggregate expenditures | aggregate output |


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PARADOX OF THRIFT, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2014. [Accessed: April 16, 2014].


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CLASSICAL ECONOMICS

A theory of economics, especially directed toward macroeconomics, based on the unrestricted workings of markets and the pursuit of individual self interests. Classical economics relies on three key assumptions--flexible prices, Say's law, and saving-investment equality--in the analysis of macroeconomics. The primary implications of this theory are that markets automatically achieve equilibrium and in so doing maintain full employment of resources without the need for government intervention. Classical economics emerged from the foundations laid by Adam Smith in his book An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations, published in 1776. Although it fell out of favor in the 1930s, many classical principles remain important to modern macroeconomic theories, especially aggregate market (AS-AD) analysis, rational expectations theory, and supply-side economics.

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State of the ECONOMY

Sales of New Single-Family Homes
February 2014
444,000 (seasonal adjusted annual rate)
Down 3.3% from January 2014

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time wandering around the shopping mall seeking to buy either several magazines on computer software or a T-shirt commemorating the second moon landing. Be on the lookout for celebrities who speak directly to you through your television.
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