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October 21, 2014 

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GDI: The abbreviation for gross domestic income, which is the total market value of all final goods and services produced within the political boundaries of an economy during a given period of time, usually a year, as calculated using the income approach to measuring gross domestic product. Gross domestic income is virtually identical to gross domestic product (GDP), with one minor difference, the statistical discrepancy. As a matter of fact, the statistical discrepancy is identified as the difference between GDP and GDI.

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PARADOX OF THRIFT: The notion that an increase in saving, which is prudent for an individual during bad economic times, is not the best course of action for the macroeconomy. If total saving in the economy increases, then consumption and aggregate expenditures decline, which causes a decline in aggregate output.

     See also | saving | consumption expenditures | contraction | business cycle | multiplier | aggregate expenditures | aggregate output |


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PARADOX OF THRIFT, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2014. [Accessed: October 21, 2014].


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KINKED-DEMAND CURVE ANALYSIS

An analysis using the kinked-demand curve to explain rigid prices often found with oligopoly. The kinked-demand curve contains two distinct segments--one for higher prices that is more elastic and one for lower prices that is less elastic. Key to this analysis is that the corresponding marginal revenue curve contains three segments--one associated with the more elastic segment, one associated with the less elastic segment, and one associated with the kink. A profit-maximizing firm can then equate marginal cost to a wide range of marginal revenue values along the vertical segment of the marginal revenue curve. This suggests that marginal cost must change significantly before an oligopolistic firm is inclined to change price.

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APLS

State of the ECONOMY

Unemployment
August 2014
6.1% Down slightly
Bureau of Labor Statistics

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PINK FADFLY
[What's This?]

Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time calling an endless list of 800 numbers wanting to buy either a 200-foot blue garden hose or a video camera with stop action features. Be on the lookout for cardboard boxes.
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This isn't me! What am I?

Only 1% of the U.S. population paid income taxes when the income tax was established in 1914.
"I shall do less whenever I shall believe what I am doing hurts the cause and I shall do more whenever I shall believe doing more will help the cause. I shall try to correct errors when shown to be errors and I shall adopt new views so fast as they shall appear to be true views. "

-- Abraham Lincoln, 16th US president

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