Google
Saturday 
March 28, 2015 

AmosWEB means Economics with a Touch of Whimsy!

AmosWEBWEB*pediaGLOSS*aramaECON*worldCLASS*portalQUIZ*tasticPED GuideXtra CrediteTutorA*PLS
Today's Index
Yesterday's Index
276.3

Help us compile the AmosWEB Free Lunch Index. Tell us about your last lunch.

Skipped lunch altogether.
Bought by another.
Ate lunch at home.
Brought lunch from home.
Fast food drive through.
Fast food dine in.
All-you-can eat buffet.
Casual dining with tip.
Fancy upscale with tip.

More About the Index
Least intelligent day of the week.

Monday.
Tuesday.
Wednesday.
Thursday.
Friday.
Saturday or Sunday.

THIRD ESTATE: In past centuries, this included the peasants, serfs, or slaves who performed the dirty deeds for the ruling elite. In modern times, this is the workers, taxpayers, and consumers who have limited ownership of and control over resources usually nothing more than their own labor. The third estate, which forms the backbone of any modern economy, is usually at odds with the business leaders of the second estate. Help may come from the government leaders of the first estate or the journalist of the fourth estate--but don't count on it.

Visit the GLOSS*arama

Most Viewed (Number)Worth a Look Visit the WEB*pedia

PARADOX OF THRIFT: The notion that an increase in saving, which is prudent for an individual during bad economic times, is not the best course of action for the macroeconomy. If total saving in the economy increases, then consumption and aggregate expenditures decline, which causes a decline in aggregate output.

     See also | saving | consumption expenditures | contraction | business cycle | multiplier | aggregate expenditures | aggregate output |


Recommended Citation:

PARADOX OF THRIFT, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2015. [Accessed: March 28, 2015].


AmosWEB Encyclonomic WEB*pedia:

Additional information on this term can be found at:

WEB*pedia: paradox of thrift

Search Again?

Back to the GLOSS*arama

AGGREGATE EXPENDITURES LINE

A graphical depiction of the relation between aggregate expenditures by the four macroeconomic sectors (household, business, government, and foreign) and the level of aggregate income or production. In Keynesian economics, the aggregate expenditures line is the essential component of the Keynesian cross analysis used to identify equilibrium income and production. Like any straight line, the aggregate expenditures line is characterized by vertical intercept, which indicates autonomous expenditures, and slope, which indicates induced expenditures. The aggregate expenditures line used in Keynesian economics is derived by adding or stacking investment, government purchases, and net exports to the consumption line.

Complete Entry | Visit the WEB*pedia


APLS

State of the ECONOMY

Building Permits
September 2014
1,018,000
Up 1.5% from August 2014 Source: Econ Stats Adm.

More Stats

PINK FADFLY
[What's This?]

Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time waiting for visits from door-to-door solicitors hoping to buy either a birthday gift for your mother or a weathervane with a horse on top. Be on the lookout for broken fingernail clippers.
Your Complete Scope

This isn't me! What am I?

Lewis Carroll, the author of Alice in Wonderland, was the pseudonym of Charles Dodgson, an accomplished mathematician and economist.
"Do not go where the path may lead, go instead where there is no path and leave a trail."

-- Ralph Waldo Emerson

WLLN
Weak Law of Large Numbers
A PEDestrian's Guide
Xtra Credit
Tell us what you think about AmosWEB. Like what you see? Have suggestions for improvements? Let us know. Click the User Feedback link.

User Feedback



| AmosWEB | WEB*pedia | GLOSS*arama | ECON*world | CLASS*portal | QUIZ*tastic | PED Guide | Xtra Credit | eTutor | A*PLS |
| About Us | Terms of Use | Privacy Statement |

Thanks for visiting AmosWEB
Copyright ©2000-2015 AmosWEB*LLC
Send comments or questions to: WebMaster