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November 28, 2014 

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AD-AS ANALYSIS: An economic model relating the price level and real production that is used to analyze business cycles, gross domestic product, unemployment, inflation, stabilization policies, and related macroeconomic phenomena. The AS-AD model, inspired by the standard market model, captures the interaction between aggregate demand (the buyers) and short-run and long-run aggregate supply (the sellers).

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PRICE FLOOR: A legally established minimum price. Pressured by special interest groups, our beloved government is often convinced that the price of a good needs to be kept at a higher level. Examples of goods that have had price floors bestowed upon them include farm products and workers. The argument in both of these examples is that suppliers aren't getting enough income for the stuff they sell (food or labor). A higher price is then expected to generate more income to these deserving souls. Unfortunately, price floors tend to create as many or more problems than they solve. They create inefficient surpluses.

     See also | market | price | regulation | surplus | minimum wage | price ceiling | minimum wage |


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PRICE FLOOR, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2014. [Accessed: November 28, 2014].


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MARGINAL COST AND MARGINAL PRODUCT

The U-shape of the marginal cost curve is closely related to the hump-shape of the marginal product curve. The increasing portion of the marginal product curve corresponds with the decreasing portion of the marginal cost curve. The decreasing portion of the marginal product curve corresponds with the increasing portion of the marginal cost curve. The peak of the marginal product curve corresponds with the minimum of the marginal cost curve.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time flipping through mail order catalogs hoping to buy either a pair of blue silicon oven mitts or a coffee cup commemorating the 2000 Olympics. Be on the lookout for vindictive digital clocks with revenge on their minds.
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