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October 24, 2017 

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MASS PRODUCTION: The production of large quantities of virtually identical goods using large scale operations. Such production typically makes use of large factories that benefit from economies of scale. The "mass" aspect of mass production indicates: (1) that large quantities, or masses, of goods are produced and (2) that these goods are being purchased or consumed by the majority of the population, or large masses of people. Mass production is largely a consequence of the industrial revolution, which moved society from a rural-based population engaged in agrarian production to an urban-based population engaged in factory production.

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PRICE FLOOR: A legally established minimum price. Pressured by special interest groups, our beloved government is often convinced that the price of a good needs to be kept at a higher level. Examples of goods that have had price floors bestowed upon them include farm products and workers. The argument in both of these examples is that suppliers aren't getting enough income for the stuff they sell (food or labor). A higher price is then expected to generate more income to these deserving souls. Unfortunately, price floors tend to create as many or more problems than they solve. They create inefficient surpluses.

     See also | market | price | regulation | surplus | minimum wage | price ceiling | minimum wage |


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PRICE FLOOR, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2017. [Accessed: October 24, 2017].


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THREE-SECTOR INJECTIONS-LEAKAGES MODEL

A variation of the Keynesian injections-leakages model that includes the three domestic sectors--the household sector, the business sector, and the government sector. This model provides an alternative to the three-sector aggregate expenditures (Keynesian cross) analysis of government stabilization policies, especially how fiscal policy changes in government purchases and taxes can be used to close recessionary gaps and inflationary gaps. Equilibrium is identified as the intersection between the S + T line and the I + G line. Two related variations are the two-sector injections-leakages model and the four-sector injections-leakages model.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time searching for a specialty store hoping to buy either an instructional DVD on learning to the play the oboe or a small, foam rubber football. Be on the lookout for high interest rates.
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