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April 20, 2018 

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MACROECONOMIC THEORIES: Scientific theories that seek to explain phenomena associated with the macroeconomy. The primary phenomena investigated are unemployment, inflation, and the level of aggregate production. Macroeconomic theories also inevitably provide policy recommendations intended to improve the performance of the economy and to correct macroeconomic problems. A few of the more noted macroeconomic theories are: Classical economics, Keynesian economics, aggregate market (AS-AD) analysis, IS-LM analysis, Monetarism, and New Classical economics.

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PRICE FLOOR: A legally established minimum price. Pressured by special interest groups, our beloved government is often convinced that the price of a good needs to be kept at a higher level. Examples of goods that have had price floors bestowed upon them include farm products and workers. The argument in both of these examples is that suppliers aren't getting enough income for the stuff they sell (food or labor). A higher price is then expected to generate more income to these deserving souls. Unfortunately, price floors tend to create as many or more problems than they solve. They create inefficient surpluses.

     See also | market | price | regulation | surplus | minimum wage | price ceiling | minimum wage |


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PRICE FLOOR, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2018. [Accessed: April 20, 2018].


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NEAR-PUBLIC GOODS

Goods characterized by nonrival consumption and the ability to exclude nonpayers. Near-public goods are one of four types of goods differentiated by consumption rivalry and nonpayer excludability. The other three goods are near-public (rival consumption and nonpayers can be excluded), public (nonrival consumption and nonpayers cannot be excluded), and common-property (rival consumption and nonpayers cannot be excluded). The ease of excluding of nonpayers means near-public goods can be exchanged through markets, but nonrival consumption means efficiency can only be achieved with government intervention.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time touring the new suburban shopping complex seeking to buy either an ink cartridge for your printer or a rechargeable battery for your camera. Be on the lookout for florescent light bulbs that hum folk songs from the sixties.
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One of the largest markets for gold in the United States is the manufacturing of class rings.
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