March 23, 2018 

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WAGES, AGGREGATE SUPPLY DETERMINANT: One of several specific aggregate supply determinants assumed constant when the short-run aggregate supply curve is constructed, and that shifts the short-run aggregate supply curve when it changes. An increase in the wages causes a decrease (leftward shift) of the short-run aggregate supply curve. A decrease in the wages causes an increase (rightward shift) of the short-run aggregate supply curve. Other notable aggregate supply determinants include the technology, energy prices, and the capital stock. Wages are an example of a resource price aggregate supply determinant.

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PRODUCT LIFE CYCLE: The four stages that a product experiences during its life, usually illustrated with a curve. All products have a limited life expectancy. Some are very short, like the Beta Recording Systems, and some are very lengthy, like the television. The four stages are introduction, growth, maturity, and decline. Each stage has certain characteristics associated with it. The way a business handles each stage determines the long-term viability of the product. An example: During the introduction stage: costs are high, customer familiarity with the product is low, profits are generally non-existent, and competition is limited, if at all. If the business does not deal with these conditions properly, the product may never reach the growth stage.

     See also | introduction stage | growth stage | maturity stage | decline stage | profit | product | service |

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A mathematical connection between average factor cost and marginal factor cost stating that the change in the average factor cost depends on a comparison between average factor cost and marginal factor cost. For perfect competition, with no market control, marginal factor cost is equal to average factor cost, and average factor cost does not change. For monopsony and other firms with market control, marginal factor cost is greater than average factor cost, and average factor cost rises.

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