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December 16, 2018 

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SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION: (SEC) A federal government agency that regulates the trading of corporate stock to protect investors against unscrupulous practices. Like a number of other federal regulatory agencies, the SEC was established in the 1930s--1934 to be exact. The impetus for its formation was to prevent investors from manipulating the stock market and to prevent other practices that contributed to the 1929 stock market crash. The SEC has all sorts of rules governing the stock market, including information disclosure, insider trading, speculation, and use of credit.

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PRODUCT LIFE CYCLE: The four stages that a product experiences during its life, usually illustrated with a curve. All products have a limited life expectancy. Some are very short, like the Beta Recording Systems, and some are very lengthy, like the television. The four stages are introduction, growth, maturity, and decline. Each stage has certain characteristics associated with it. The way a business handles each stage determines the long-term viability of the product. An example: During the introduction stage: costs are high, customer familiarity with the product is low, profits are generally non-existent, and competition is limited, if at all. If the business does not deal with these conditions properly, the product may never reach the growth stage.

     See also | introduction stage | growth stage | maturity stage | decline stage | profit | product | service |


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CLASSICAL AGGREGATE SUPPLY CURVE

An aggregate supply curve--a graphical representation of the relation between real production and the price level--that reflects the basic principles of classical economics. The classical aggregate supply curve is vertical at the full-employment level of real production indicating that the quantity of aggregate production is independent of the price level. An alternative is the Keynesian aggregate supply curve.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time at a dollar discount store seeking to buy either a flower arrangement for your aunt or a birthday greeting card for your uncle. Be on the lookout for defective microphones.
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The Dow Jones family of stock market price indexes began with a simple average of 11 stock prices in 1884.
"If things are not going well with you, begin your effort at correcting the situation by carefully examining the service you are rendering, and especially the spirit in which you are rendering it."

-- Roger Babson, statistician and columnist

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