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January 18, 2019 

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ZERO BOND: Also termed a zero coupon bond, a bond that does not pay interest, in which the return is generated by the difference between the purchase price and the face value paid at maturity. Because they do not pay interest, zero bonds are sold at a discount. For example, a $10,000 zero bond that matures in one year, would generate a 10% return if it sold at a discount of $9,000.

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UTILITY MEASUREMENT: A quantification of the satisfaction of wants and needs achieved through the consumption of goods and services. In principle, utility measurement can take one of two forms: (1) cardinal, which is based on numerical values (1, 2, 3, etc.) and (2) ordinal which is based on rankings (first, second, third, etc.). While the hypothetical instructional analysis of utility relies on cardinal utility, ordinal utility is a more realistic way to measure satisfaction.

     See also | util | cardinal utility | ordinal utility | utility | consumer demand theory | utility analysis | total utility | marginal utility | satisfaction | market demand | third rule of subjectivity | utilitarianism | marginal utility-price ratio | utility maximization | constrained utility maximization | consumer equilibrium | rule of consumer equilibrium | marginal utility and demand | marginal utility-price ratio | law of diminishing marginal utility | income change, utility analysis | price change, utility analysis | preferences change, utility analysis |


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AGGREGATE DEMAND DECREASE, LONG-RUN AGGREGATE MARKET

A shock to the long-run aggregate market caused by a decrease in aggregate demand resulting in and illustrated by a leftward shift of the aggregate demand curve. A decrease in aggregate demand in the long-run aggregate market results in an increase in the price level but no change in real production. The level of real production resulting from the aggregate demand shock is full-employment real production.

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