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EQUILIBRIUM PRICE: The price that exists when a market is in equilibrium. In particular, the equilibrium price is the price that equates the quantity demanded and quantity supplied, which is termed the equilibrium quantity. Moreover, the equilibrium price is simultaneously equal to the both the demand price and supply price. In a market graph, like the one displayed here, the equilibrium price is found at the intersection of the demand curve and the supply curve. The equilibrium price is also commonly referred to as the market-clearing price.

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Lesson Contents
Unit 1: Intro
  • Definition
  • Characteristics
  • A Mix
  • Product Differentiation
  • Unit 1 Summary
  • Unit 2: Revenue And Cost
  • The Revenue Numbers
  • The Revenue Curves
  • The Cost Numbers
  • The Cost Curves
  • Unit 2 Summary
  • Unit 3: Output
  • The Numbers
  • The Curves
  • Long-Run Equilibrium
  • Unit 3 Summary
  • Unit 4: Analysis
  • Profit, Loss, And Supply
  • Efficiency And Excess Capacity
  • Advertising
  • Unit 4 Summary
  • Unit 5: Evaluation
  • The Bad: Inefficient
  • The Good: Differences
  • Regulation
  • Unit 5 Summary
  • Course Home
    Monopolistic Competition

    • The first unit of this lesson, A Bunch Of Firms, begins this lesson with a look at the nature of monopolistic competition and how it is related to other market structures.
    • In the second unit, Revenue And Cost, we review the revenue side and the cost side the production decision for a monopolistically competitive firm.
    • The third unit, The Output Level, then looks at the profit-maximizing output production decision by a firm in monopolistic competition.
    • In the fourth unit, Doing Some Analysis, we examine a few of the implications of market characterized by monopolistic competition.
    • The fifth and final unit, Good Or Bad?, then closes this lesson by considering the good and the bad of monopolistic competition.

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    REAL-BALANCE EFFECT

    A change in aggregate expenditures on real production made by the household, business, government, and foreign sectors that results because a change in the price level alters the purchasing power of money. This is one of three effects underlying the negative slope of the aggregate demand curve associated with a movement along the aggregate demand curve and a change in aggregate expenditures. The other two are interest-rate effect and net-export effect. The real-balance effect is somewhat analogous to the income effect underlying the negative slope of the market demand curve.

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