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AGGREGATE SUPPLY: The total (or aggregate) real production of final goods and services available in the domestic economy at a range of price levels, during a given time period. Aggregate supply (AS) is one half of the aggregate market analysis; the other half is aggregate demand. Aggregate supply, relates the economy's price level, measured by the GDP price deflator, and aggregate domestic production, measured by real gross domestic product. The aggregate supply relation is generally separated into long-run aggregate supply, in which all prices and wages and flexible and all markets are in equilibrium, and short-run aggregate supply, in which some prices and wage are NOT flexible and some markets are NOT in equilibrium.

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Lesson 11: Circular Flow | Unit 3: Government Page: 14 of 22

Topic: Government Borrowing <=PAGE BACK | PAGE NEXT=>

When government does not collect enough taxes to pay for purchases, it borrows through the financial markets.
  • The federal deficit is borrowing by the federal government to make up the difference between taxes and spending.
  • State and local governments also borrow through financial markets.
  • The green flow leaving the financial markets and entering the government sector is government borrowing.
  • Government sector purchases can be less than taxes, which means government saves to the financial markets.
  • Many state and local governments actually save. State and local saving reduces total government sector borrowing in times of high federal deficits.

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AGGREGATE MARKET SHOCKS

Disruptions of the equilibrium in the aggregate market (or AS-AD model) caused by shifts of the aggregate demand, short-run aggregate supply, or long-run aggregate supply curves. Shocks of the aggregate market are associated with, and thus used to analyze, assorted macroeconomic phenomena such as business cycles, unemployment, inflation, stabilization policies, and economic growth. The specific analysis of aggregate market shocks identifies changes in the price level (GDP price deflator) and real production (real GDP). Changes in the price level and real production have direct implications for the unemployment rate, the inflation rate, national income, and a host of other macroeconomic measures.

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APLS

BLACK DISMALAPOD
[What's This?]

Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time lost in your local discount super center wanting to buy either a coffee cup commemorating last Friday (you know why) or a wall poster commemorating the first day of spring. Be on the lookout for the happiest person in the room.
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Post WWI induced hyperinflation in German in the early 1900s raised prices by 726 million times from 1918 to 1923.
"Man is born to live, not to prepare for life. "

-- Boris Pasternak, writer

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Balance of Payments
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