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AGGREGATE MARKET ANALYSIS: An investigation of macroeconomic phenomena, including unemployment, inflation, business cycles, and stabilization policies, using the aggregate market interaction between aggregate demand, short-run aggregate supply, and long-run aggregate supply. Aggregate market analysis, also termed AS-AD analysis, has been the primary method of investigating macroeconomic activity since the 1980s, replacing Keynesian economic analysis that was predominant for several decades. Like most economic analysis, aggregate market analysis employs comparative statics, the technique of comparing the equilibrium after a shock with the equilibrium before a shock. While the aggregate market model is usually presented as a simply graph at the introductory level, more sophisticated and more advanced analyses often involve a system of equations.

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Lesson 13: Aggregate Demand | Unit 2: Doing More Page: 9 of 22

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  • The four expenditures that make up aggregate demand: consumption, investment, government purchases, and net export expenditures.
  • How consumption expenditures are made by households on services, durable goods, and nondurable goods.
  • How investment expenditures are made by businesses on inventories, equipment, and fixed structures.
  • How only government purchases of final goods and services qualify as expenditures for aggregate demand.
  • Net exports, which are exports minus imports. Net exports represent the net expenditures of the foreign sector on our domestically produced final goods and services.

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PARADOX OF THRIFT

The notion that an increase in saving, which is generally good advice for an individual during bad economic times, can actually worsen the macroeconomy causing a reduction in aggregate income, production, and paradoxically a decrease in saving. The paradox of thrift is an example of the fallacy of composition stating that what is true for the part is not necessarily true for the whole.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time waiting for visits from door-to-door solicitors wanting to buy either yellow cotton balls or a set of steel-belted radial snow tires. Be on the lookout for the happiest person in the room.
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Mark Twain said "I wonder how much it would take to buy soap buble if there was only one in the world."
"When you play, play hard; when you work, don't play at all. "

-- Theodore Roosevelt, 26th US president

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