Google
Friday 
November 26, 2021 

AmosWEB means Economics with a Touch of Whimsy!

AmosWEBWEB*pediaGLOSS*aramaECON*worldCLASS*portalQUIZ*tasticPED GuideXtra CrediteTutorA*PLS
HOMOGENEOUS GOOD: Goods that are either physically identical or at least viewed as identical by buyers. In particular, the producer of a good can not be identified from the good itself. This is a key assumption underlying the perfect competition market structure, and like other assumptions is only approximated in the real world. Agricultural products, metals, and energy goods come as close as any in the real world.

Visit the GLOSS*arama

Most Viewed (Number) Visit the WEB*pedia

Lesson Contents
Unit 1: Price Taker
  • A Perfect Market
  • Characteristics
  • Revenue
  • Profit Maximization
  • Unit 1 Summary
  • Unit 2: Short-Run Output
  • The Revenue Side
  • The Revenue Numbers
  • The Cost Side
  • Comparing Totals
  • Comparing Marginals
  • Unit 2 Summary
  • Unit 3: Doing Graphs
  • Total Curves
  • Profit Curve
  • Marginal Curves
  • Dividing Revenue
  • Short-Run Alternatives
  • Short-Run Supply
  • Unit 3 Summary
  • Unit 4: Long-Run Equilibrium
  • Long-Run Marginal Cost
  • Adjustment
  • Entry And Exit
  • Equilibrium Conditions
  • Long-Run Supply
  • Unit 4 Summary
  • Unit 5: Evaluation
  • The Good
  • The Bad
  • Market Control
  • Unit 5 Summary
  • Course Home
    Perfect Competition

    • The first unit of this lesson, Price Taker, begins this study with a look at the general structure of a perfectly competitive market.
    • In the second unit, Short-Run Output, we take a look at the short-run production decision faced by a perfectly competitive firm based on the cost and revenue numbers.
    • The third unit, Doing Graphs, then looks at the short-run production decision faced by a perfectly competitive firm using a graphical analysis of cost and revenue.
    • In the fourth unit, Long-Run Equilibrium, we examine the nature of long-run adjustment by a perfectly competition industry when all inputs are variable.
    • The fifth and final unit, Evaluation, then closes this lesson by considering the pros and cons of a perfectly competitive industry.

    BEGIN Lesson =>


    <=PREVIOUS Lesson | NEXT Lesson =>

    REGRESSIVE TAX

    A tax in which the proportion of income paid in taxes is smaller for higher income levels. A regressive income tax exists if taxpayers with more income pay a lower tax rate relative to income as income increases. A regressive tax is one of three alternations. The other two are progressive tax, in which the proportion of income paid in taxes is greater for higher income levels, and proportional tax, in which the proportion of income paid in taxes is the same for all income levels.

    Complete Entry | Visit the WEB*pedia


    APLS

    PINK FADFLY
    [What's This?]

    Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time at a going out of business sale seeking to buy either a small palm tree that will fit on your coffee table or several magazines on fashion design. Be on the lookout for fairy dust that tastes like salt.
    Your Complete Scope

    This isn't me! What am I?

    The penny is the only coin minted by the U.S. government in which the "face" on the head looks to the right. All others face left.
    "There is more to life than increasing its speed. "

    -- Mohandas Gandhi, activist

    AOQ
    Average Outgoing Quality
    A PEDestrian's Guide
    Xtra Credit
    Tell us what you think about AmosWEB. Like what you see? Have suggestions for improvements? Let us know. Click the User Feedback link.

    User Feedback



    | AmosWEB | WEB*pedia | GLOSS*arama | ECON*world | CLASS*portal | QUIZ*tastic | PED Guide | Xtra Credit | eTutor | A*PLS |
    | About Us | Terms of Use | Privacy Statement |

    Thanks for visiting AmosWEB
    Copyright ©2000-2021 AmosWEB*LLC
    Send comments or questions to: WebMaster