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INDUCED GOVERNMENT PURCHASES: Government purchases that depend on income or production (especially national income or gross national product). An increase in national income triggers an increase in induced government purchases. Induced government purchases is graphically depicted as the slope of the government purchases line and is measured by the marginal propensity for government purchases. The induced relation between income and government purchases, as well as other induced expenditures, form the foundation of the multiplier effect triggered by changes in autonomous expenditures.

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Lesson 17: Money | Unit 2: More About Money Page: 9 of 25

Topic: Characteristics <=PAGE BACK | PAGE NEXT=>

There are four characteristics that let money do what money does.

Four characteristics:

  1. Durable: It helps to retain value from one exchange to the next and store value for future exchanges.
  2. Divisible: It lets us accurately match an amount of money to the precise value of a good.
  3. Transportable: It lets us to conduct exchanges far and wide, to go where we need to go for an exchange.
  4. Non-counterfeitable: It keeps the value of money from being diluted.

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GOOD TYPES

The economy produces four distinct types of goods based on two key characteristics -- consumption rivalry and nonpayer excludability. Consumption rivalry arises if consumption of a good by one person prevents another from also consuming. Nonpayer excludability means potential consumers who do not pay for a good can be excluded from consuming. Private goods are rival in consumption and easily subject to the exclusion of nonpayers. Public goods are nonrival in consumption and the exclusion of nonpayers is virtually impossible. Near-public goods are nonrival in consumption and easily subject to exclusion. Common-property goods are rival in consumption and not easily subject to exclusion. Private goods can be efficiently exchanged through markets. Public, near-public and common-property goods cannot, but require some degree of government involvement for efficiency.

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ORANGE REBELOON
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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time at the confiscated property police auction looking to buy either a pair of red goulashes with shiny buckles or a handcrafted bird feeder. Be on the lookout for letters from the Internal Revenue Service.
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In his older years, Andrew Carnegie seldom carried money because he was offended by its sight and touch.
"Act well at the moment, and you have performed a good action for all eternity."

-- Johann Kaspar Lavater

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