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Lesson 4: Production Possibilities | Unit 5: Investment Page: 19 of 24

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Investment is the tradeoff between consumption goods used for current satisfaction and capital goods that expand future productive capabilities.
  • Investment is not just putting money into the stock market. Investment is giving up current satisfaction to obtain greater future production, usually seen as giving up consumption goods to produce capital goods.
  • Education and human capital that increase the productive skills and ability of labor.
  • Exploration for mineral or fossil fuel deposits that add to land resources.
  • Scientific research that expands technology and resource quality.
  • The downside of investment is risk. There is no guarantee that you'll get something tomorrow.
Let's consider this basic tradeoff between capital and consumption.
  • Capital and consumption are the two basic types of goods needed for investment. If we produce more calibrators (capital), then we give up some jogging shoes (consumption).
  • This tradeoff IS the fundamental act of investment. In the graph to the right, if we move from bundle A to E to I, we are giving up jogging shoes and getting calibrators.
We are investing!

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EXCHANGE RATE POLICIES

Policies undertaken by domestic governments often in conjunction with international financial organizations to control exchange rates through foreign exchange markets. The three most common exchange rate policies are flexible exchange rates, fixed exchange rates, and managed flexible exchange rates. Flexible exchange rates are allowed to adjust through unrestrained forces of demand and supply in the foreign exchange market. Fixed exchange rates are established at a given level. Managed flexible exchange rates are allowed to change within boundaries, but subject to control if they change too much.

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