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DISSAVING: Negative saving during a given period of time in which consumption expenditures exceed disposable income. Dissaving is made possible by spending past or future disposable income on current consumption, that is, using income saved from previous periods or borrowing income to be earned in future periods. Saving is generally illustrated by the vertical difference when between the consumption line and the 45-degree line. Dissaving results when the 45-degree line lies above the consumption line.

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Lesson Contents
Unit 1: The Concept
  • A Definition
  • So What?
  • Unit 1 Summary
  • Unit 2: Resources
  • Factors
  • Working Together
  • Free or Scarce?
  • Comparisons
  • Unit 2 Summary
  • Unit 3: Opportunity Cost
  • The Concept
  • Economic Cost
  • Unit 3 Summary
  • Unit 4: College Cost
  • Out of Pocket
  • What Else?
  • Unit 4 Summary
  • Unit 5: THE Problem
  • No Free Lunch
  • Solutions?
  • Unit 5 Summary
  • Course Home
    Scarcity

    In this lesson you'll see why scarcity tends to make economists grumpy. You'll see that scarcity is a perpetual condition that exists because people have unlimited wants and needs, but limited resources used to satisfy these wants and needs. You'll also see how this scarcity problem underlies the common notion of cost, which is integral to the study of economics. The five units contained in this lesson provide a tour through the economic problem of scarcity.

    • The first unit examines the fundamental concept of scarcity -- the combination of limited resources and unlimited wants and needs -- that is virtually synonymous with the study of economics.
    • The second unit discusses the four basic categories of limited resources --labor, capital, land, and entrepreneurship -- that produce the goods that are used to satisfy unlimited wants and needs.
    • In the third unit, we take a look at the notion of opportunity cost and see how it is related to the scarcity problem.
    • We then turn out attention in the fourth unit to a simple example of the explicit and implicit costs of attending college.
    • The fifth and final unit in this lesson then ponders why scarcity is considered THE economic problem and providing a little insight into why economists are grump.

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    IN-KIND PAYMENTS

    A payment, usually in exchange for the productive efforts of resources, that takes the form of goods and services produced by the resource buyer rather than the economy's standard monetary unit (that is, dollars). In other words, resource owners are compensated with a portion of the output that they help to produce. The standard method of compensation, which is illustrated by the circular flow model, is for a firm to pay resource owners using money revenue received from selling its production. Hence most factor payments are monetary payments. However, in some circumstances firms and resource owners find it more convenient to use actual production for compensation, eliminating the sell-production-for-money step.

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    APLS

    WHITE GULLIBON
    [What's This?]

    Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time at a going out of business sale seeking to buy either a genuine down-filled pillow or one of those "hang in there" kitty cat posters. Be on the lookout for door-to-door salesmen.
    Your Complete Scope

    This isn't me! What am I?

    Only 1% of the U.S. population paid income taxes when the income tax was established in 1914.
    "Difficulties mastered are opportunities won. "

    -- Winston Churchill, Statesman

    AMB
    Adjusted Monetary Base
    A PEDestrian's Guide
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