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NATIONALIZATION: The process of a national government taking over the ownership of a private business or industry, usually in conjunction with a major revolution that establishes a communistic or socialist command economy. Nationalization was a common practice, sort of a fad, during the 1950s,1960s, and 1970s. Even non-revolutionary industrialized countries in Europe jumped onto the nationalization bandwagon. The United States also took at stab at nationalizing passenger train service when Amtrak was established in 1970.

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Lesson Contents
Unit 1: Background
  • Doing Supply
  • Factor Payments
  • Factors of Production
  • Factor Markets
  • Circular Flow
  • Unit 1 Summary
  • Unit 2: Resources
  • Alike But Different
  • Labor: Satisfaction And Leisure
  • Capital: Financial And Physical
  • Land: Space And Materials
  • Entrepreneurship: Risk
  • Unit 2 Summary
  • Unit 3: Factor Supply
  • Supply Times Three
  • Market Control Times Four
  • Factor Cost Times Three
  • Supply Curves Times Two
  • Unit 3 Summary
  • Unit 4: Determinants
  • The Old Standards
  • Mobility
  • Geographic Mobility
  • Occupational Mobility
  • Unit 4 Summary
  • Unit 5: Taking Stock
  • Review
  • Preview
  • Unit 5 Summary
  • Course Home
    Factor Supply

    • The first unit of this lesson, Background, begins by laying the foundation for factor markets and factor supply.
    • In the second unit, Resources, we examine specific supply considerations for the alternative factors of production.
    • The third unit, Cost And Supply, then takes a look at the three key factor cost concepts -- total, average, and marginal.
    • In the fourth unit, Determinants, we examine the key determinants that shift the factor supply curve, especially mobility.
    • The fifth and final unit, Taking Stock, then closes this lesson with a review of factor supply and a preview of factor market analysis to come.

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    SLOPE, INVESTMENT LINE

    The positive slope of the investment line is also termed the marginal propensity to invest (MPI). This slope is greater than zero but less than one, reflecting induced investment. The slope of the investment line affects the slope of the aggregate expenditures line and thus also affects the magnitude of the multiplier process.

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    APLS

    YELLOW CHIPPEROON
    [What's This?]

    Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time searching for a specialty store looking to buy either a wall poster commemorating last Friday (you know why) or a country wreathe. Be on the lookout for telephone calls from long-lost relatives.
    Your Complete Scope

    This isn't me! What am I?

    The average length of a "business lunch" is about 36 minutes.
    "Every man must decide whether he will walk in the light of creative altruism or in the darkness of destructive selfishness."

    -- Martin Luther King, Jr., clergyman

    AS
    Aggregate Supply
    A PEDestrian's Guide
    Xtra Credit
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