Google
Wednesday 
February 8, 2023 

AmosWEB means Economics with a Touch of Whimsy!

AmosWEBWEB*pediaGLOSS*aramaECON*worldCLASS*portalQUIZ*tasticPED GuideXtra CrediteTutorA*PLS
OLIGOPOLY AND MONOPOLISTIC COMPETITION: Oligopoly and monopolistic competition have some similarities, but also have a few important differences. Both are examples of imperfect competition on the market structure continuum between ideals of perfect competition and monopoly. However, oligopoly contains a small number of large firms and monopolistic competition contains a large number of small firms. The dividing line between oligopoly and monopolistic competition can be blurred due to the number of firms in the industry.

Visit the GLOSS*arama

Most Viewed (Number) Visit the WEB*pedia

Lesson Contents
Unit 1: Factor Markets
  • Getting Paid
  • Trading Resources
  • Resources
  • Factor Payments
  • Circular Flow
  • Unit 1 Summary
  • Unit 2: Derived Demand
  • Factor Demand
  • A Few Issues
  • Marginal Productivity Theory
  • Three (Or Four) Marginals
  • Unit 2 Summary
  • Unit 3: The Curve
  • Marginal Revenue Product Schedule
  • Marginal Revenue Product Curve
  • The Hiring Decision
  • Factor Demand Curve
  • Unit 3 Summary
  • Unit 4: Determinants
  • Shifting Demand
  • Product Demand
  • Factor Productivity
  • Other Prices
  • Unit 4 Summary
  • Unit 5: Taking Stock
  • Review
  • Preview
  • Unit 5 Summary
  • Course Home
    Factor Demand

    • The first unit of this lesson, Background, begins this lesson by laying the foundations for the study of factor demand.
    • In the second unit, Derived Demand, we see how the demand for a factor of production is based on the demand for the good it produces.
    • The third unit, The Curve, then derives the factor demand curve, which is the relation between the price employers are willing to pay and the quantity demanded.
    • In the fourth unit, Determinants, we examine the three key determinants that shift the factor demand curve -- product price, factor productivity, and other factor prices.
    • The fifth and final unit, Taking Stock, then closes this lesson with a review of factor demand and a preview of factor market analysis in other lessons.

    BEGIN Lesson =>


    <=PREVIOUS Lesson | NEXT Lesson =>

    CHANGE IN QUANTITY SUPPLIED

    A movement along a given supply curve caused by a change in supply price. The only factor that can cause a change in quantity supplied is price. A related, but distinct, concept is a change in supply.

    Complete Entry | Visit the WEB*pedia


    APLS

    RED AGGRESSERINE
    [What's This?]

    Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time wandering around the downtown area trying to buy either a replacement remote control for your television or a replacement nozzle for your shower. Be on the lookout for telephone calls from former employers.
    Your Complete Scope

    This isn't me! What am I?

    The New York Stock Exchange was established by a group of investors in New York City in 1817 under a buttonwood tree at the end of a little road named Wall Street.
    "Learn to enjoy every minute of your life. Be happy now. Don't wait for something outside of yourself to make you happy in the future. Think how really precious is the time you have to spend, whether it's at work or with your family. Every minuteshould be enjoyed and savored."

    -- Earl Nightingale

    ADV PMT
    Advance Payment
    A PEDestrian's Guide
    Xtra Credit
    Tell us what you think about AmosWEB. Like what you see? Have suggestions for improvements? Let us know. Click the User Feedback link.

    User Feedback



    | AmosWEB | WEB*pedia | GLOSS*arama | ECON*world | CLASS*portal | QUIZ*tastic | PED Guide | Xtra Credit | eTutor | A*PLS |
    | About Us | Terms of Use | Privacy Statement |

    Thanks for visiting AmosWEB
    Copyright ©2000-2023 AmosWEB*LLC
    Send comments or questions to: WebMaster