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BOYCOTT: An organized effort to reduce the sales of a particular good that's intended to punished the producer or seller. Boycotts are promoted by labor unions to inflict harm on their companies and (hopefully) encourage their employers to settle labor distributes. Special interest groups also use boycotts to achieve assorted political goals. Some groups, for example, have called for boycotts of the products advertised on "undesirable" television shows, while others have boycotted companies that do business in politically "undesirable" countries.

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Lesson Contents
Unit 1: Intro
  • Definition
  • Market Structure Continuum
  • Real World Oligopoly
  • Structure And Behavior
  • Unit 1 Summary
  • Unit 2: Structure
  • Concentration
  • Concentration Ratios
  • Herfindahl Index
  • Entry Barriers
  • Unit 2 Summary
  • Unit 3: Behavior
  • Interdependence
  • Collusion
  • Merger
  • Unit 3 Summary
  • Unit 4: Analysis
  • Kinked-Demand Curve
  • Kinked-Demand Curve Analysis
  • Collusion Cost
  • Collusion Output
  • Game Theory
  • Unit 4 Summary
  • Unit 5: Evaluation
  • The Bad
  • The Good
  • Government Intervention?
  • Unit 5 Summary
  • Course Home
    Oligopoly

    • The first unit of this lesson, A Few Firms, begins this lesson with a look at the nature of oligopoly and how it is related to other market structures.
    • In the second unit, Structure, we see how markets with a small number of large firms are structured.
    • The third unit, Behavior, then looks at some of activities undertaken by oligopoly that are not seen in other market structures.
    • In the fourth unit, Some Graphs, we use a few graphs to examine different ways that oligopoly firms interact in the production of output.
    • The fifth and final unit, Taking Stock, then closes this lesson by considering the good and the bad of oligopoly and why it is often prone to government scrutiny.

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    RISK PREFERENCES

    Three alternative views concerning the choice between a risky outcome and a certain outcome -- risk aversion, risk neutrality, and risk loving. Some people prefer to avoid risk (risk aversion), others enjoy engaging in risk (risk loving), and still others are indifferent (risk neutrality). Most people are risk averse, which underlies the provision of insurance. Others who are risk loving are more inclined to gamble, play the stock market, and be entrepreneurs.

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    BROWN PRAGMATOX
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    Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time at the confiscated property police auction seeking to buy either a weathervane with a cow on top or a box of multi-colored, plastic paper clips. Be on the lookout for mail order catalogs with hidden messages.
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