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INCOME RECEIVED BUT NOT EARNED: Abbreviate IRBNE, this is income received by the household sector, but not earned by a factor of production. The three types of income received but not earned are Social Security payments, unemployment compensation payments, and welfare payments. These are also the three key transfer payments from the government sector to the household sector. The basic goal of transfer payments is to transfer a portion of the income earned by the factors of production (because they HAVE income) to other members of the household sector (who presumably NEED more income than they have). IRBNE is added to national income to derive personal income.

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Lesson Contents
Unit 1: Background
  • Doing Supply
  • Factor Payments
  • Factors of Production
  • Factor Markets
  • Circular Flow
  • Unit 1 Summary
  • Unit 2: Resources
  • Alike But Different
  • Labor: Satisfaction And Leisure
  • Capital: Financial And Physical
  • Land: Space And Materials
  • Entrepreneurship: Risk
  • Unit 2 Summary
  • Unit 3: Factor Supply
  • Supply Times Three
  • Market Control Times Four
  • Factor Cost Times Three
  • Supply Curves Times Two
  • Unit 3 Summary
  • Unit 4: Determinants
  • The Old Standards
  • Mobility
  • Geographic Mobility
  • Occupational Mobility
  • Unit 4 Summary
  • Unit 5: Taking Stock
  • Review
  • Preview
  • Unit 5 Summary
  • Course Home
    Factor Supply

    • The first unit of this lesson, Background, begins by laying the foundation for factor markets and factor supply.
    • In the second unit, Resources, we examine specific supply considerations for the alternative factors of production.
    • The third unit, Cost And Supply, then takes a look at the three key factor cost concepts -- total, average, and marginal.
    • In the fourth unit, Determinants, we examine the key determinants that shift the factor supply curve, especially mobility.
    • The fifth and final unit, Taking Stock, then closes this lesson with a review of factor supply and a preview of factor market analysis to come.

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    AVERAGE COST

    The opportunity cost incurred per unit of good produced. This is calculated by dividing the cost of production by the quantity of output produced. While average cost is a general term relating cost and the quantity of output, three specific average cost terms are average total cost, average variable cost, and average fixed cost. A related cost term is marginal cost.

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    Marginal Revenue Product
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