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October 18, 2018 

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GOOD: When used without an adjective modifier (like "final" good or "intermediate" good), this generically means a physical, tangible product used to satisfy people's wants and needs . This term good should be contrasted with the term service, which captures the intangible satisfaction of wants and needs. As such, you will frequently see the plural combination of these two phrases together "goods and services" to indicate the wide assortment of economic goods produced using the economy's scarce resources. As you might imagine this general notion of wants and needs satisfying goods and services pops up throughout the study of economics.

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Lesson 18: Banking | Unit 3: Reserve Banking Page: 13 of 24

Topic: Goldsmith <=PAGE BACK | PAGE NEXT=>

Banking sort of evolved from the goldsmithing profession.

Setting the stage of the story:

  • It takes place at a time and a place when gold is the economy's commodity money: Medieval Europe.
  • Fred is a goldsmith, a craftsman who fashions products from gold.

Fred:

  • Fred's raw material is also the economy's money.
  • Gold input is valuable in use for what Fred creates and also valuable as the medium of exchange.
  • Fred must keep his raw material safe and secure.
  • Fred has a safe.

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PRICE DISCRIMINATION

The act of selling the same good to different buyers for different prices that are not justified by different production costs. This is practiced by suppliers who have achieved some degree of market control, especially monopoly. Common examples of price discrimination are electricity rates, long-distance telephone charges, movie ticket prices, airplane ticket prices, and assorted child or senior citizen discounts. Price discrimination takes the form of one of three degrees: (1) first degree, in which each price is the maximum price that buyers are willing and able to pay, (2) second degree, in which price is based on the quantity sold, and (3) third degree, in which prices are based on an easily identifiable characteristic of the buyer.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time searching for a specialty store seeking to buy either a rechargeable battery for your computer or shoe laces for your snow boots. Be on the lookout for deranged pelicans.
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This isn't me! What am I?

Lombard Street is London's equivalent of New York's Wall Street.
"Executives who get there and stay suggest solutions when they present the problems. "

-- Malcolm Forbes, business executive

NAIRU
Non-Accelerating Inflation Rate of Unemployment
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