March 17, 2018 

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LEGAL TYPES: The three primary types of legal firm organizations are: (1) proprietorship, (2) partnership, and (3) corporation. One primary difference between these three legal types are number of owners -- proprietorship has one, partnership has two or more (but usually a small number), and corporation can have anywhere from one or to millions. A second difference is the liability of the owners -- proprietorship and partnership owners have unlimited liability and corporation owners have limited liability. Three newer firm types include (1) limited partnership, (2) S corporation, and (3) limited liability company. Each of these three are hybrids, with characteristics of proprietorship, partnership, corporation.

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Lesson 4: Production Possibilities | Unit 3: The Curve Page: 9 of 24

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We can transform the schedule of production possibility numbers into a graph.
  • Each bundle can be represented by a point in two dimensional production possibilities space.
  • The two dimensions of the space are clock calibrators on the horizontal axis and jogging shoes on the vertical axis.
  • The horizontal axis is measured between 0 and 11 calibrators.
  • The vertical axis is measured between 0 and 500 jogging shoes.
  • The two axis are joined at the origin.
  • The plotted bundles form a semi-circle pattern.
  • If these were stars in the night sky we might name it the arc of production. But it's not, so we won't.

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Oligopolistic industries share several behavioral tendencies, including: (1) interdependence, (2) rigid prices, (3) nonprice competition, (4) mergers, and (5) collusion. In other words, each oligopolistic firm keeps a close eye on the decisions made by other firms in the industry (interdependence), are reluctant to change prices (rigid prices), but instead try to attract customers from the competition using incentives other than prices (nonprice competition), and when they get tired of competing with their competitors they are inclined to cooperate formally and legally (mergers) or informally and illegally (collusion).

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time looking for a downtown retail store hoping to buy either a New York Yankees baseball cap or several magazines on home repairs. Be on the lookout for cardboard boxes.
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In the early 1900s around 300 automobile companies operated in the United States.
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