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IN-KIND PAYMENT: A payment, usually in exchange for the productive efforts of resources, that takes the form of goods and services rather than the economy's standard monetary unit (that is, dollars). In other words, resource owners are compensated with a portion of the output that they helped to produce. The standard method of compensation, which is illustrated by the circular flow model, is for a firm to pay resource owners using money revenue received from selling its production. Hence most factor payments are monetary payments. However, in some circumstances firms and resource owners find it more convenient to use actual production for compensation, eliminating the middle sell-production-for-money step

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BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS: An agency of the U.S. Federal government, specifically a branch of the U.S. Department of Labor, that compiles and reports a wide range of economic data and measurements. At the top of their list of important economic numbers maintained by what is abbreviated the BLS, are the unemployment rate (and related measures) and the Consumer Price Index (and related measures). Economists rely heavily on the BLS to provide data needed to evaluate and analyze the macroeconomy.

     See also | unemployment rate | Consumer Price Index | unemployment | inflation | price level |


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SAY'S LAW

A principle of classical economics developed the French economist Jean-Baptiste Say that is commonly summarized as "supply creates its own demand." This law, also referred to as Say's "theory of markets" or "law of markets," indicates that the act of producing aggregate output generates a sufficient amount of aggregate income to purchase all of the output produced. This principle indicated that excess production or insufficient demand for production was unlikely to occur, at least for any extended period. When combined with flexible prices and saving-investment equality, Say's law further implied that an economy would achieve and maintain full employment of resources. This law was singled out by John Maynard Keynes in his critique of classical economics, but remains relevant in current macroeconomic analysis, reflected in the circular flow model.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time searching for a specialty store trying to buy either pink cotton balls or a genuine down-filled comforter. Be on the lookout for mail order catalogs with hidden messages.
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Ragnar Frisch and Jan Tinbergen were the 1st Nobel Prize winners in Economics in 1969.
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