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December 3, 2021 

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DOUBLE TAXATION: The payment of income taxes on corporate profits twice, once when it is received by a corporation as profit and second when it is received by shareholders as dividends. Double taxation has been thorn in the side of those who own a lot of corporate stock and thus receive a lot of stock dividends. It is also problem in standard corporations (C corporations) which as given rise to a newer legal type of firm, S corporation, which is not subject to double taxation.

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PERFECT COMPETITION, REALISM: Perfect competition is an idealized market structure that does NOT exist in the real world. While some real world industries might come relatively close to one or two of the four key characteristics of perfect competition, none matches all four sufficiently that they can be declared PERFECTLY competitively. Some industries come close on the large number of small firms and the identical product characteristics. A few industries have relatively good, although not perfect, information about prices and technology. However, almost all industries fall far short of the perfect mobility characteristics.

     See also | perfect competition | perfect competition, characteristics | perfect competition, efficiency | perfect competition, demand |


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PRICE DISCRIMINATION

The act of selling the same good to different buyers for different prices that are not justified by different production costs. This is practiced by suppliers who have achieved some degree of market control, especially monopoly. Common examples of price discrimination are electricity rates, long-distance telephone charges, movie ticket prices, airplane ticket prices, and assorted child or senior citizen discounts. Price discrimination takes the form of one of three degrees: (1) first degree, in which each price is the maximum price that buyers are willing and able to pay, (2) second degree, in which price is based on the quantity sold, and (3) third degree, in which prices are based on an easily identifiable characteristic of the buyer.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time at a going out of business sale wanting to buy either a set of luggage without wheels or a how-to book on wine tasting. Be on the lookout for spoiled cheese hiding under your bed hatching conspiracies against humanity.
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