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ZERO SLOPE: A horizontal line in which the numerical value of the slope, calculated as the change in the variable on the vertical axis divided by a change in the variable on the horizontal axis, is zero. In other words, the Y-axis variable is fixed, or constant, for any and all values of the X-axis variable.

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UNCERTAINTY: The possibility that any number of things could happen in the future. In other words, the future is not known. This should be compared with risk, which is assigning probabilities to alternative possibilities.

     See also | risk | information |


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UNCERTAINTY, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2023. [Accessed: March 30, 2023].


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AGGREGATE EXPENDITURES

The total expenditures on gross domestic product undertaken in a given time period by the four sectors--household, business, government, and foreign. Expenditures made by each of these sectors are commonly termed consumption expenditures, investment expenditures, government purchases, and net exports. Aggregate expenditures (AE) are a cornerstone in the study of macroeconomics, playing critical roles in Keynesian economics, aggregate market analysis, and to a lesser degree, monetarism. In particular, aggregate expenditures are combined with the price level as aggregate demand.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time at a flea market wanting to buy either decorative picture frames or storage boxes for your income tax returns. Be on the lookout for crowded shopping malls.
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Post WWI induced hyperinflation in German in the early 1900s raised prices by 726 million times from 1918 to 1923.
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