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July 15, 2018 

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ASSET: Something that you own. For a person, assets can be financial, like money, stocks, bonds, bank accounts, and government securities, or they can be physical things, like cars, boats, houses, clothes, food, and land. The important assets for our economy are the output we have produced and the resources, capital, and natural resources used to produce that output.

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Lesson Contents
Unit 1: The Set Up
  • Demand Review
  • Bring On Utility
  • Choices
  • Unit 1 Summary
  • Unit 2: A Simple Choice
  • One Good
  • Demand For A Good
  • Unit 2 Summary
  • Unit 3: Complex Choices
  • Two Goods
  • How Much Of Each?
  • A Short Cut?
  • Income And Prices
  • Rule Of Consumer Equilibrium
  • Unit 3 Summary
  • Unit 4: On To Demand
  • A Generalized Choice
  • A Price Change
  • Marginal Utility Curve
  • Unit 4 Summary
  • Unit 5: Beyond Demand
  • Many Choices
  • Demand Elasticity
  • Market Supply
  • Unit 5 Summary
  • Course Home
    Utility and Demand

    This lesson undertakes a detailed investigation into the decision-making process underlying the purchase of goods and services. Doing so provides a behind-the-scenes examination of market demand, offering an explanation for the inverse relation between demand price and quantity demanded that is the law of demand.

    • The first unit of this lesson, The Set Up, begins with a review of the market demand and consumer demand theory.
    • In the second unit, A Simple Choice, we examine the decision-making process for purchasing a single good.
    • The third unit, Complex Choices, then complicates matters slightly by adding a second good into the decision making mix.
    • The fourth unit, On To Demand, presents the rule of consumer equilibrium that captures the essence of this decision-making process and how it helps explain the law of demand.
    • The fifth unit and final unit, Beyond Demand, explores how consumer demand theory provides insight to noneconomic choices, demand elasticity, and market supply.

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    SAVING SCHEDULE

    A table or chart that represents the relation between saving by the household sector and income. A saving schedule is commonly used for a basic, instructional presentation of aggregate saving activity by the household sector and is also used as a source of numbers for deriving the saving line. The key measures derived from the saving-income relation in the schedule are average propensity to save and marginal propensity to save. The consumption schedule is comparable, and more important, table for the relation between consumption and income.

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    APLS

    PURPLE SMARPHIN
    [What's This?]

    Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time at a garage sale hoping to buy either pink cotton balls or a genuine down-filled comforter. Be on the lookout for celebrities who speak directly to you through your television.
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    This isn't me! What am I?

    One of the largest markets for gold in the United States is the manufacturing of class rings.
    "The time to repair the roof is when the sun is shining."

    -- John F. Kennedy, 35th U. S. president

    IRBNE
    Income Received But Not Earned
    A PEDestrian's Guide
    Xtra Credit
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