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OLIGOPOLY, CONCENTRATION: Oligopoly is a market structure that contains a small number of relatively large firms, meaning oligopoly markets tend to be concentrated. A small number of large firms account for a majority of total output. Concentration unto itself is not necessarily bad, but it often leads to inefficient behavior, such as collusion and nonprice competition. Concentration is measured in three ways--market share, concentration ratio, Herfindahl index.

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Menu of Lessons
A. Introduction
  • Economic Basics
  • Economic Science
  • Scarcity
  • Production Possibilities

  • B. The Market
  • Demand
  • Supply
  • Market
  • Market Shocks

  • C. Behind Demand
  • Consumer Demand
  • Utility and Demand
  • Elasticity Basics
  • Elasticity and Demand

  • D. Behind Supply
  • The Firm
  • Production
  • Cost
  • Perfect Competition

  • E. Market Structures
  • Market Control
  • Monopoly
  • Monopolistic Competition
  • Oligopoly

  • F. Factor Markets
  • Factor Demand
  • Factor Supply
  • Factor Market Equilibrium

  • Jump to Macro Course
    Microeconomics

    Introductory Microeconomics is the study of the individuals, firms, markets, and industries, including the topics of consumer demand, production, cost, market structures, and factor markets.

    To access a given lesson, click on the corresponding link in the Menu of Lessons presented to the right.

    LONG-RUN AVERAGE COST CURVE, DERIVATION

    The long-run average cost curve is the envelope of an infinite number of short-run average total cost curves, with each short-run average total cost curve tangent to, or just touching, the long-run average cost curve at a single point corresponding to a single output quantity. The key to the derivation of the long-run average cost curve is that each short-run average total cost curve is constructed based on a given amount of the fixed input, usually capital. As such, when the quantity of the fixed input changes, the short-run average total cost curve shifts to a new location.

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    APLS

    State of the ECONOMY

    Federal Funds Rate
    December 26, 2015
    .50%
    Up 0.25%

    More Stats

    BROWN PRAGMATOX
    [What's This?]

    Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time lost in your local discount super center wanting to buy either a large green chalkboard shaped like the state of Maine or a replacement battery for your pocket calculator. Be on the lookout for telephone calls from long-lost relatives.
    Your Complete Scope

    This isn't me! What am I?

    The first U.S. fire insurance company was established by Benjamin Franklin in 1752 in Philadelphia.
    "Don't judge each day by the harvest you reap but by the seeds that you plant. "

    -- Robert Louis Stephenson, writer

    IGARCH
    Integrated Generalized Autoregressive Conditional Heteroskedasticity
    A PEDestrian's Guide
    Xtra Credit
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