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LABOR UNION MOVEMENT: Activities on the part of workers in the United States, beginning in the mid-1800s and extending into the mid-1900s, to establish labor unions and otherwise promote the interests of workers. This movement, which coincided with the onset of the U.S. industrial revolution, was launched with the Commonwealth versus Hunt court decision in 1842 which made it legal to join a labor union. The labor union movement had a turbulent and violent history as organized labor sought to gain greater control over labor market activities. The movement reached its peak in the 1950s, with just under 30% of the labor force belonging to labor unions.

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Lesson Contents
Unit 1: Adjustments
  • Overview
  • Three Questions
  • Unit 1 Summary
  • Unit 2: Determinants
  • Shifts
  • Demand
  • Supply
  • Unit 2 Summary
  • Unit 3: Single Shifts
  • More Demand
  • Less Demand
  • More Supply
  • Less Supply
  • Unit 3 Summary
  • Unit 4: Double Shifts
  • More Demand and More Supply
  • More Demand and Less Supply
  • Less Demand and Less Supply
  • Less Demand and More Supply
  • Unit 4 Summary
  • Unit 5: Cause and Effect
  • Economic Science
  • Link Sequence
  • Unit 5 Summary
  • Course Home
    Market Shocks

    Our goal in this lesson is to investigate disruptions of the market. Specifically, we want to use the market model previously developed, to examine the why and how of market shocks. What causes market shocks? How do markets react when shocked? If the truth be known, markets in the real world don't remain at the same locations for very long. They move. They adjust. Prices change. Quantities change. We can understand these real world market changes, by analyzing what happens to market model when it's shocked.

    • The first unit, Adjustments, lays the foundation for analyzing market shocks with an overview of the adjustment process and the role played by the ceteris paribus assumption.
    • In the second unit, Determinants, we review the five determinants of demand and five determinants of supply that cause market disruptions.
    • We then move into the actual adjustment process in the third unit, Single Shifts, examining four disruptions that involve a shift in either the demand or supply curve.
    • The fourth unit, Double Shifts, builds on these four basic shifts to exam four complex shocks that have simultaneous shifts in both the demand and supply curves.
    • We end this lesson in the fifth unit, Cause and Effect, by relating market shocks to the fundamental notion of cause and effect inherent in the study of economic science.

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    MIDPOINT ELASTICITY FORMULA

    A simple technique for calculating the coefficient of elasticity by estimating the average elasticity for discrete changes in two variables. The distinguishing characteristic of this formula is that percentage changes are calculated based on the average of the initial and ending values of each variable, rather than initial values. An alternative technique is the endpoint elasticity formula.

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    APLS

    PINK FADFLY
    [What's This?]

    Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time browsing about a thrift store seeking to buy either a desktop calendar with all federal and state holidays highlighted or a half-dozen helium filled balloons. Be on the lookout for pencil sharpeners with an attitude.
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    This isn't me! What am I?

    In the late 1800s and early 1900s, almost 2 million children were employed as factory workers.
    "Act well at the moment, and you have performed a good action for all eternity."

    -- Johann Kaspar Lavater

    LAD
    Least Absolute Deviations
    A PEDestrian's Guide
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