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ABSOLUTE POVERTY LEVEL: The amount of income a person or family needs to purchase an absolute amount of the basic necessities of life. These basic necessities are identified in terms of calories of food, BTUs of energy, square feet of living space, etc. The problem with the absolute poverty level is that there really are no absolutes when in comes to consuming goods. You can consume a given poverty level of calories eating relatively expensive steak, relatively inexpensive pasta, or garbage from a restaurant dumpster. The income needed to acquire each of these calorie "minimums" vary greatly. That's why some prefer a relative poverty level.

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Lesson Contents
Unit 1: Factor Markets
  • Getting Paid
  • Trading Resources
  • Resources
  • Factor Payments
  • Circular Flow
  • Unit 1 Summary
  • Unit 2: Derived Demand
  • Factor Demand
  • A Few Issues
  • Marginal Productivity Theory
  • Three (Or Four) Marginals
  • Unit 2 Summary
  • Unit 3: The Curve
  • Marginal Revenue Product Schedule
  • Marginal Revenue Product Curve
  • The Hiring Decision
  • Factor Demand Curve
  • Unit 3 Summary
  • Unit 4: Determinants
  • Shifting Demand
  • Product Demand
  • Factor Productivity
  • Other Prices
  • Unit 4 Summary
  • Unit 5: Taking Stock
  • Review
  • Preview
  • Unit 5 Summary
  • Course Home
    Factor Demand

    • The first unit of this lesson, Background, begins this lesson by laying the foundations for the study of factor demand.
    • In the second unit, Derived Demand, we see how the demand for a factor of production is based on the demand for the good it produces.
    • The third unit, The Curve, then derives the factor demand curve, which is the relation between the price employers are willing to pay and the quantity demanded.
    • In the fourth unit, Determinants, we examine the three key determinants that shift the factor demand curve -- product price, factor productivity, and other factor prices.
    • The fifth and final unit, Taking Stock, then closes this lesson with a review of factor demand and a preview of factor market analysis in other lessons.

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    REAL-BALANCE EFFECT

    A change in aggregate expenditures on real production made by the household, business, government, and foreign sectors that results because a change in the price level alters the purchasing power of money. This is one of three effects underlying the negative slope of the aggregate demand curve associated with a movement along the aggregate demand curve and a change in aggregate expenditures. The other two are interest-rate effect and net-export effect. The real-balance effect is somewhat analogous to the income effect underlying the negative slope of the market demand curve.

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    YELLOW CHIPPEROON
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    Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time driving to a factory outlet wanting to buy either a turbo-powered vacuum cleaner or a battery-powered, rechargeable vacuum cleaner. Be on the lookout for cardboard boxes.
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    The standard "debt" notation I.O.U. does not mean "I owe you," but actually stands for "I owe unto..."
    "The majority of men meet with failure because of their lack of persistence in creating new plans to take the place of those that fail. "

    -- Napoleon Hill, author

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