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WAGES, AGGREGATE SUPPLY DETERMINANT: One of several specific aggregate supply determinants assumed constant when the short-run aggregate supply curve is constructed, and that shifts the short-run aggregate supply curve when it changes. An increase in the wages causes a decrease (leftward shift) of the short-run aggregate supply curve. A decrease in the wages causes an increase (rightward shift) of the short-run aggregate supply curve. Other notable aggregate supply determinants include the technology, energy prices, and the capital stock. Wages are an example of a resource price aggregate supply determinant.

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Lesson Contents
Unit 1: Background
  • Doing Supply
  • Factor Payments
  • Factors of Production
  • Factor Markets
  • Circular Flow
  • Unit 1 Summary
  • Unit 2: Resources
  • Alike But Different
  • Labor: Satisfaction And Leisure
  • Capital: Financial And Physical
  • Land: Space And Materials
  • Entrepreneurship: Risk
  • Unit 2 Summary
  • Unit 3: Factor Supply
  • Supply Times Three
  • Market Control Times Four
  • Factor Cost Times Three
  • Supply Curves Times Two
  • Unit 3 Summary
  • Unit 4: Determinants
  • The Old Standards
  • Mobility
  • Geographic Mobility
  • Occupational Mobility
  • Unit 4 Summary
  • Unit 5: Taking Stock
  • Review
  • Preview
  • Unit 5 Summary
  • Course Home
    Factor Supply

    • The first unit of this lesson, Background, begins by laying the foundation for factor markets and factor supply.
    • In the second unit, Resources, we examine specific supply considerations for the alternative factors of production.
    • The third unit, Cost And Supply, then takes a look at the three key factor cost concepts -- total, average, and marginal.
    • In the fourth unit, Determinants, we examine the key determinants that shift the factor supply curve, especially mobility.
    • The fifth and final unit, Taking Stock, then closes this lesson with a review of factor supply and a preview of factor market analysis to come.

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    OCCUPATIONAL MOBILITY

    The mobility, or movement, of factors of production from one type of productive activity to another type of productive activity. In particular, occupational mobility is the ease with which resources can change occupations. This is one of two types of mobility. The other is geographic mobility.

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