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JOINT PRODUCT: One of two goods that are produced jointly using the same resource--that is, the production of one good automatically triggers the production of the other. Also termed by-products or complements-in-production, a noted example is the production of two goods--beef and leather--from one resource--cattle. Another joint product example is lumber and sawdust--both produced from a single tree.

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Lesson Contents
Unit 1: The Basics
  • Opportunity Cost
  • Cost Times Two
  • Profit Times Three
  • Unit 1 Summary
  • Unit 2: Three Totals
  • Fixed And Variable
  • A Table Of Totals
  • Total Curves
  • TP And TVC
  • Unit 2 Summary
  • Unit 3: Four More Measures
  • Three Averages
  • A Table Of Averages
  • Average Curves
  • One Marginal
  • A Marginal Table
  • The Marginal Curve
  • Unit 3 Summary
  • Unit 4: Long-Run Cost
  • Doing The Long Run
  • A Choice Of Plants
  • Planning Curve
  • Scale Economies
  • Unit 4 Summary
  • Unit 5: Previewing Supply
  • Production Stages
  • Marginal Cost
  • Unit 5 Summary
  • Course Home
    Cost

    • The first unit of this lesson, The Basics, begins this our study with a review of the opportunity cost notion and how it relates to business activity.
    • In the second unit, Three Totals, we take a look at the three total cost measures, including total cost, total variable cost, and total fixed cost.
    • The third unit, Four More Measures, then presents four additional cost measures -- average total cost, average variable cost, average fixed cost, and marginal cost.
    • In the fourth unit, Long-Run Cost, we examine how scale economies and diseconomies affect cost in the long run.
    • The fifth and final unit, Previewing Supply, then closes this lesson by previewing the importance of cost, especially marginal cost, to the supply decision by a firm.

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    GAINS FROM TRADE

    The combination of consumer surplus and producer surplus obtained by buyers and sellers when engaging in a market exchange. Gains from trade arise because buyers are typically willing and able to pay a higher price to purchase a good than what they end up paying and because sellers are typically willing and able to accept a lower price to sell a good than what they end up receiving. Both sides of the market exchange are thus better off, have a net gain in welfare, by making the trade. While all types of market exchanges generate gains from trade, this topic is perhaps most important for an understanding of international trade.

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    In the Middle Ages, pepper was used for bartering, and it was often more valuable and stable in value than gold.
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