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SLOPE: A measure of the flatness or steepness of line. It can be thought of as the 'rise' over the 'run', that is the change in the variable on the vertical axis (rise) divided by the change in the variable on the horizontal axis (run).

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Lesson Contents
Unit 1: Short-Run Production
  • Making Stuff
  • Two Inputs: Fixed and Variable
  • Two Runs: Short and Long
  • Two More Runs
  • Unit 1 Summary
  • Unit 2: Production Measures
  • Total Product
  • Average Product
  • Marginal Product
  • THE Law
  • Unit 2 Summary
  • Unit 3: Product Curves
  • Total Product Curve
  • Average Product Curve
  • Marginal Product Curve
  • THE Law Again
  • Production Stages
  • Unit 3 Summary
  • Unit 4: Long-Run Production
  • Making Plans
  • Returns To Scale
  • Increasing Returns To Scale
  • Decreasing Returns To Scale
  • Constant Returns To Scale
  • Unit 4 Summary
  • Unit 5: Supply
  • A Review
  • A Preview
  • Unit 5 Summary
  • Course Home
    Production

    • The first unit of this lesson, Short-Run Production, begins our study by introducing a few basic concepts underlying production, especially short run, long run, fixed input, and variable input.
    • In the second unit, Production Measures, we take a look the three standard measures of production -- total product, average product, and marginal product.
    • The third unit, Product Curves, then presents graphical relations for these three measures -- total product curve, average product curve, and marginal product curve.
    • In the fourth unit, Long-Run Production, we examine the role returns to scale play in long-run production.
    • The fifth and final unit, Supply, then closes this lesson by previewing the importance of production to the supply decisions by firms.s

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    KEYNESIAN CROSS

    A diagram illustrating the basic Keynesian theory of macroeconomics, with aggregate expenditures measured on the vertical axis and aggregate production measured on the horizontal axis, with the relation between aggregate expenditures and aggregate production represented by a positively-sloped aggregate expenditures line. The "cross" aspect of this diagram is the intersection between the aggregate expenditures line and a 45-degree line indicating every point of equality between aggregate expenditures and aggregate production. The "Keynesian" aspect of this diagram is derived from John Maynard Keynes, the developer and namesake of Keynesian economics.

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    APLS

    BROWN PRAGMATOX
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    Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time flipping through mail order catalogs seeking to buy either a birthday gift for your grandmother or a T-shirt commemorating yesterday. Be on the lookout for jovial bank tellers.
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    Junk bonds are so called because they have a better than 50% chance of default, carrying a Standard & Poor's rating of CC or lower.
    "I much prefer the sharpest criticism of a single intelligent man to the thoughtless approval of the masses."

    -- Johannes Kepler, German Astronomer

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