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FACTOR DEMAND ELASTICITY: The elasticity of a factor demand curve is affected by four things: (1) the price elasticity of demand for the good produced, (2) the production function technology and elasticity of marginal physical product, (3) the ease of factor substitutability, and (4) the share of the factor's cost relative to total cost. Changes in any of these four items can cause the price elasticity of factor demand to change. In other words, the quantity of factor services demanded will become more or less sensitive to changes in the factor price.

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Lesson Contents
Unit 1: Short-Run Production
  • Making Stuff
  • Two Inputs: Fixed and Variable
  • Two Runs: Short and Long
  • Two More Runs
  • Unit 1 Summary
  • Unit 2: Production Measures
  • Total Product
  • Average Product
  • Marginal Product
  • THE Law
  • Unit 2 Summary
  • Unit 3: Product Curves
  • Total Product Curve
  • Average Product Curve
  • Marginal Product Curve
  • THE Law Again
  • Production Stages
  • Unit 3 Summary
  • Unit 4: Long-Run Production
  • Making Plans
  • Returns To Scale
  • Increasing Returns To Scale
  • Decreasing Returns To Scale
  • Constant Returns To Scale
  • Unit 4 Summary
  • Unit 5: Supply
  • A Review
  • A Preview
  • Unit 5 Summary
  • Course Home
    Production

    • The first unit of this lesson, Short-Run Production, begins our study by introducing a few basic concepts underlying production, especially short run, long run, fixed input, and variable input.
    • In the second unit, Production Measures, we take a look the three standard measures of production -- total product, average product, and marginal product.
    • The third unit, Product Curves, then presents graphical relations for these three measures -- total product curve, average product curve, and marginal product curve.
    • In the fourth unit, Long-Run Production, we examine the role returns to scale play in long-run production.
    • The fifth and final unit, Supply, then closes this lesson by previewing the importance of production to the supply decisions by firms.s

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    MARGINAL PROPENSITY TO SAVE

    The proportion of each additional dollar of household income that is used for saving. The marginal propensity to save (abbreviated MPS) is another term for the slope of the saving line and is calculated as the change in saving divided by the change in income. The MPS plays a central role in Keynesian economics. It quantifies the saving-income relation, which is the flip side of the consumption-income relation, and thus it reflects the fundamental psychological law. It is also a critical to the multiplier process. A related saving measure is the average propensity to save.

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    APLS

    GRAY SKITTERY
    [What's This?]

    Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time waiting for visits from door-to-door solicitors seeking to buy either a Boston Red Sox baseball cap or a square lamp shade with frills along the bottom. Be on the lookout for mail order catalogs with hidden messages.
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    In 1914, Ford paid workers who were age 22 or older $5 per day -- double the average wage offered by other car factories.
    "It is very rare that you meet with obstacles in this world (that) the humblest man has not the faculties to surmount. "

    -- Henry David Thoreau, philosopher

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