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January 17, 2018 

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OMO: The abbreviation for open market operations, which is the Federal Reserve System's buying and selling of government securities in an effort to alter bank reserves and subsequently the nation's money supply. These actions, under the direction of the Federal Open Market Committee, are the Fed's number one, most effective, most often used tool of monetary policy. If, for example, the Fed wants to increase the money supply (termed easy money) it buy's government securities. If the Fed chooses to reduce the money supply (called tight money) it sells some government securities.

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Lesson Contents
Unit 1: Intro
  • Definition
  • A Few Examples
  • Market Control
  • Competition
  • Unit 1 Summary
  • Unit 2: Four Types
  • A Continuum
  • Perfect Competition
  • Monopoly
  • Monopolistic Competition
  • Oligopoly
  • Other Structurres
  • Unit 2 Summary
  • Unit 3: Getting Control
  • Profit Motivation
  • Entry Barriers
  • Product Differentiation
  • Unit 3 Summary
  • Unit 4: Using Control
  • Takes And Makers
  • Demand Curves
  • Practices
  • Unit 4 Summary
  • Unit 5: Government
  • Efficiency
  • Regulation
  • Unit 5 Summary
  • Course Home
    Market Structures

    Our investigation into market structures lays the foundation for a closer examination of monopoly, monopolistic competition, and oligopoly. This lesson takes a look at how markets are structured based on their competitiveness, the degree of market control held by firms, the acquisition of this market control, and the use market control.

    • The first unit of this lesson, Competition And Control, begins this lesson with a look at competition and market control.
    • In the second unit, Four Types, we examine the four basic types of market structures -- perfect competition, monopoly, monopolistic competition, and oligopoly.
    • The third unit, Getting Control, then looks at two key ways that firms are able to acquire or increase their market control -- product differentiation and entry barriers.
    • In the fourth unit, Using Control, we investigate what firms do when they have market control.
    • The fifth and final unit, Government, then closes this lesson by considering the role government plays in regulating market control.

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    FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION

    An independent agency of the federal government that insures deposits in banks and other depository institutions which is intended to preserve and promote public confidence in the U.S. financial system. The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) was created in 1933 in response to the thousands of bank failures that occurred during the Great Depression. It is one of the key agencies, along with the Federal Reserve System and Comptroller of the Currency, responsible regulating the U.S. banking industry.

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    APLS

    GRAY SKITTERY
    [What's This?]

    Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time at the confiscated property police auction seeking to buy either handcrafted decorations to hang on your walls or throw pillows for your bed. Be on the lookout for deranged pelicans.
    Your Complete Scope

    This isn't me! What am I?

    A lump of pure gold the size of a matchbox can be flattened into a sheet the size of a tennis court!
    "Being defeated is only a temporary condition; giving up is what makes it permanent."

    -- Marilyn vos Savant, Author

    FAC
    Federal Advisory Council
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