March 23, 2018 

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AGGREGATE MARKET: An economic model relating the price level and real production that is used to analyze business cycles, gross domestic product, unemployment, inflation, stabilization policies, and related macroeconomic phenomena. The aggregate market, inspired by the standard market model, captures the interaction between aggregate demand (the buyers) and short-run and long-run aggregate supply (the sellers).

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Lesson Contents
Unit 1: Intro
  • Definition
  • A Few Examples
  • Market Control
  • Competition
  • Unit 1 Summary
  • Unit 2: Four Types
  • A Continuum
  • Perfect Competition
  • Monopoly
  • Monopolistic Competition
  • Oligopoly
  • Other Structurres
  • Unit 2 Summary
  • Unit 3: Getting Control
  • Profit Motivation
  • Entry Barriers
  • Product Differentiation
  • Unit 3 Summary
  • Unit 4: Using Control
  • Takes And Makers
  • Demand Curves
  • Practices
  • Unit 4 Summary
  • Unit 5: Government
  • Efficiency
  • Regulation
  • Unit 5 Summary
  • Course Home
    Market Structures

    Our investigation into market structures lays the foundation for a closer examination of monopoly, monopolistic competition, and oligopoly. This lesson takes a look at how markets are structured based on their competitiveness, the degree of market control held by firms, the acquisition of this market control, and the use market control.

    • The first unit of this lesson, Competition And Control, begins this lesson with a look at competition and market control.
    • In the second unit, Four Types, we examine the four basic types of market structures -- perfect competition, monopoly, monopolistic competition, and oligopoly.
    • The third unit, Getting Control, then looks at two key ways that firms are able to acquire or increase their market control -- product differentiation and entry barriers.
    • In the fourth unit, Using Control, we investigate what firms do when they have market control.
    • The fifth and final unit, Government, then closes this lesson by considering the role government plays in regulating market control.

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    The macroeconomic study of Keynesian economics relies on three key assumptions--rigid prices, effective demand, and savings-investment determinants. First, rigid or inflexible prices prevent some markets from achieving equilibrium in the short run. Second, effective demand means that consumption expenditures are based on actual income, not full employment or equilibrium income. Lastly, important savings and investment determinants include income, expectations, and other influences beyond the interest rate. These three assumptions imply that the economy can achieve a short-run equilibrium at less than full-employment production.

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