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AGGREGATE EXPENDITURE DETERMINANTS: An assortment of ceteris paribus factors that affect aggregate expenditures, but which are assumed constant when the aggregate expenditure line is constructed. Changes in any of the aggregate expenditures determinants cause the aggregate expenditure line to shift. While a wide variety of specific ceteris paribus factors can cause the aggregate expenditure line to shift, it's usually most convenient to group them into the four, broad expenditure categories -- consumption, investment, government purchases, and net exports. The reason is that changes in these expenditures are the direct cause of shifts in the aggregate expenditure line. If any determinant affects aggregate expenditures it MUST affect one of these four expenditures.

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Lesson Contents
Unit 1: Intro
  • Factor Market
  • Two Sides
  • Equilibrium
  • Competition
  • Circular Flow
  • Unit 1 Summary
  • Unit 2: Market Control
  • Selling Side
  • Buying Side
  • Monopsony
  • Imperfect Competition
  • Unit 2 Summary
  • Unit 3: Perfect Competition
  • Many Buyers
  • Employment
  • Efficiency
  • Unit 3 Summary
  • Unit 4: Monopsony
  • One Buyer
  • Employment
  • Efficiency
  • Unit 4 Summary
  • Unit 5: Bilateral Monopoly
  • Monopoly
  • Two Sides
  • Four Marginal Curves
  • Employment
  • Unit 5 Summary
  • Course Home
    Factor Market Equilibrium

    My duties for this lesson are to examine how the two sides of the factor market -- factor demand and factor supply -- come together to form the factor market. Like other markets, we are concerned with equilibrium and competition. The analysis of factor markets has an added bonus. It lets us examine market control from the buying side to balance other analysis of market control from the selling side. The cornerstone phrase capturing this buying-side market control is monopsony.

    • The first unit of this lesson, The Foundation, begins by reviewing factor demand and factor supply and seeing how they come together to form the factor market.
    • In the second unit, Market Control, we see how market control on the selling side of a factor market gives rise to assorted market structures, like monopsony.
    • The third unit, Perfect Competition, then takes a look at equilibrium in factor markets that operate under the guidelines of perfect competition.
    • In the fourth unit, Monopsony, we extend the analysis to factor markets with control on the buying side, especially monopsony.
    • The fifth and final unit, Bilateral Monopoly, then analyzes factor markets with monopoly control on the selling side to counter monopsony control on the buying side.

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    MANAGED FLEXIBLE EXCHANGE RATE

    An exchange rate control policy in which an exchange rate that is generally allowed to adjust to equilibrium levels through to the interaction of supply and demand in the foreign exchange market, but with occasional intervention by government. Also termed managed float or dirty float, most nations of the world currently use a managed flexible exchange rate policy. With this alternative an exchange rate is free to rise and fall, but it is subject to government control if it moves too high or too low. With managed float, the government steps into the foreign exchange market and buys or sells whatever currency is necessary keep the exchange rate within desired limits. This is one of three basic exchange rate policies used by domestic governments. The other two policies are flexible exchange rate and fixed exchange rate.

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