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INPUT: The resources or factors of production used in the production of a firm's output. This term is most frequently associated with the analysis of short-run production, and is often modified by the terms fixed and variable, as in fixed input and variable input. In the short run, the quantity of a fixed input can not be changed, meaning it can not be used to expand output. In contrast, a variable input can be changed, making it THE means of expanding output in the short run.

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Lesson Contents
Unit 1: Intro
  • Definition
  • Characteristics
  • A Mix
  • Product Differentiation
  • Unit 1 Summary
  • Unit 2: Revenue And Cost
  • The Revenue Numbers
  • The Revenue Curves
  • The Cost Numbers
  • The Cost Curves
  • Unit 2 Summary
  • Unit 3: Output
  • The Numbers
  • The Curves
  • Long-Run Equilibrium
  • Unit 3 Summary
  • Unit 4: Analysis
  • Profit, Loss, And Supply
  • Efficiency And Excess Capacity
  • Advertising
  • Unit 4 Summary
  • Unit 5: Evaluation
  • The Bad: Inefficient
  • The Good: Differences
  • Regulation
  • Unit 5 Summary
  • Course Home
    Monopolistic Competition

    • The first unit of this lesson, A Bunch Of Firms, begins this lesson with a look at the nature of monopolistic competition and how it is related to other market structures.
    • In the second unit, Revenue And Cost, we review the revenue side and the cost side the production decision for a monopolistically competitive firm.
    • The third unit, The Output Level, then looks at the profit-maximizing output production decision by a firm in monopolistic competition.
    • In the fourth unit, Doing Some Analysis, we examine a few of the implications of market characterized by monopolistic competition.
    • The fifth and final unit, Good Or Bad?, then closes this lesson by considering the good and the bad of monopolistic competition.

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    AGGREGATE SUPPLY INCREASE, LONG-RUN AGGREGATE MARKET

    A shock to the long-run aggregate market caused by an increase in aggregate supply, resulting in and illustrated by a rightward shift of the long-run aggregate supply curve. An increase in aggregate supply in the long-run aggregate market results in a decrease in the price level and an increase in real production. The level of real production resulting from the shock is a greater level of full-employment real production.

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    RED AGGRESSERINE
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    Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time looking for a downtown retail store wanting to buy either a coffee cup commemorating Thor Heyerdahl's Pacific crossing aboard the Kon-Tiki or a rechargeable battery for your cell phone. Be on the lookout for jovial bank tellers.
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    This isn't me! What am I?

    The 22.6% decline in stock prices on October 19, 1987 was larger than the infamous 12.8% decline on October 29, 1929.
    "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover."

    -- Mark Twain

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