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WILLINGNESS TO PAY: The price or dollar amount that someone is willing to give up or pay to acquire a good or service. Willingness to pay is the source of the demand price of a good. However, unlike demand price, in which buyers are on the spot of actually giving up the payment, willingness to pay does not require an actual payment. This concept is important to benefit-cost analysis, welfare economics, and efficiency criteria, especially Kaldor-Hicks efficiency. A related concept is willingness to accept.

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Lesson Contents
Unit 1: Background
  • Doing Supply
  • Factor Payments
  • Factors of Production
  • Factor Markets
  • Circular Flow
  • Unit 1 Summary
  • Unit 2: Resources
  • Alike But Different
  • Labor: Satisfaction And Leisure
  • Capital: Financial And Physical
  • Land: Space And Materials
  • Entrepreneurship: Risk
  • Unit 2 Summary
  • Unit 3: Factor Supply
  • Supply Times Three
  • Market Control Times Four
  • Factor Cost Times Three
  • Supply Curves Times Two
  • Unit 3 Summary
  • Unit 4: Determinants
  • The Old Standards
  • Mobility
  • Geographic Mobility
  • Occupational Mobility
  • Unit 4 Summary
  • Unit 5: Taking Stock
  • Review
  • Preview
  • Unit 5 Summary
  • Course Home
    Factor Supply

    • The first unit of this lesson, Background, begins by laying the foundation for factor markets and factor supply.
    • In the second unit, Resources, we examine specific supply considerations for the alternative factors of production.
    • The third unit, Cost And Supply, then takes a look at the three key factor cost concepts -- total, average, and marginal.
    • In the fourth unit, Determinants, we examine the key determinants that shift the factor supply curve, especially mobility.
    • The fifth and final unit, Taking Stock, then closes this lesson with a review of factor supply and a preview of factor market analysis to come.

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    AVERAGE TOTAL COST CURVE

    A curve that graphically represents the relation between average total cost incurred by a firm in the short-run product of a good or service and the quantity produced. The average total cost curve is constructed to capture the relation between average total cost and the level of output, holding other variables, like technology and resource prices, constant. The average total cost curve is one of three average curves. The other two are average variable cost curve and average fixed cost curve. A related curve is the marginal cost curve.

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