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LAW OF COMPARATIVE ADVANTAGE: A basic principle that states every nation has a production activity that incurs a lower opportunity cost than that of another nation, which means that trade between the two nations can be beneficial to both if each specializes in the production of a good with lower relative opportunity cost. While this law is fundamental to the study of international trade, it also applies to other activities, especially the specialization and the division of labor.

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Lesson Contents
Unit 1: Background
  • Doing Supply
  • Factor Payments
  • Factors of Production
  • Factor Markets
  • Circular Flow
  • Unit 1 Summary
  • Unit 2: Resources
  • Alike But Different
  • Labor: Satisfaction And Leisure
  • Capital: Financial And Physical
  • Land: Space And Materials
  • Entrepreneurship: Risk
  • Unit 2 Summary
  • Unit 3: Factor Supply
  • Supply Times Three
  • Market Control Times Four
  • Factor Cost Times Three
  • Supply Curves Times Two
  • Unit 3 Summary
  • Unit 4: Determinants
  • The Old Standards
  • Mobility
  • Geographic Mobility
  • Occupational Mobility
  • Unit 4 Summary
  • Unit 5: Taking Stock
  • Review
  • Preview
  • Unit 5 Summary
  • Course Home
    Factor Supply

    • The first unit of this lesson, Background, begins by laying the foundation for factor markets and factor supply.
    • In the second unit, Resources, we examine specific supply considerations for the alternative factors of production.
    • The third unit, Cost And Supply, then takes a look at the three key factor cost concepts -- total, average, and marginal.
    • In the fourth unit, Determinants, we examine the key determinants that shift the factor supply curve, especially mobility.
    • The fifth and final unit, Taking Stock, then closes this lesson with a review of factor supply and a preview of factor market analysis to come.

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    MARGINAL REVENUE, MONOPOLY

    The change in total revenue resulting from a change in the quantity of output sold. Marginal revenue indicates how much extra revenue a monopoly receives for selling an extra unit of output. It is found by dividing the change in total revenue by the change in the quantity of output. Marginal revenue is the slope of the total revenue curve and is one of two revenue concepts derived from total revenue. The other is average revenue. To maximize profit, a monopoly equates marginal revenue and marginal cost.

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    WHITE GULLIBON
    [What's This?]

    Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time calling an endless list of 800 numbers wanting to buy either a lazy Susan for you dining room table or a set of serrated steak knives, with durable plastic handles. Be on the lookout for letters from the Internal Revenue Service.
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    This isn't me! What am I?

    A lump of pure gold the size of a matchbox can be flattened into a sheet the size of a tennis court!
    "If things are not going well with you, begin your effort at correcting the situation by carefully examining the service you are rendering, and especially the spirit in which you are rendering it."

    -- Roger Babson, statistician and columnist

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