March 23, 2018 

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NEAR MONEY: Assets that are highly liquid, and can be easily exchanged for money, but can not be used directly to purchase goods. The best examples are savings accounts, certificates of deposit, and similar bank accounts. These savings near monies are added to M1 to derived M2. Several investment type near monies are added to M2 to derived M3.

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Lesson 1: Economic Basics | Unit 3: The Economy Page: 8 of 18

Topic: A Mixed Economy: Markets and Government <=PAGE BACK | PAGE NEXT=>

Markets do an effective (and efficient) job of answering the three questions of allocation--most of the time.
  • Markets are the VOLUNTARY exchange of goods and services.
  • A pure market economy is an economy that uses nothing but markets to allocate resources.
  • A pure market economy is a useful theoretical benchmark.
Market responses to the allocation questions:
  • What? Resources are used to produce goods with the highest prices.
  • How? Goods are produced using the combination of resource with the lowest prices.
  • For Whom? People with more income buy more goods.

Government also helps answer the three questions of allocation.
  • Government allocation is INVOLUNTARY. It sets the laws and rules.
  • A pure command economy is an economy that uses nothing but government to allocate resources.
  • A pure command economy is another useful theoretical benchmark.
Government responses to the allocation questions:
  • What? When government spends taxes, it dictates what goods will be produced.
  • How? Government has laws and rules that specify how resources will be used to produce goods.
  • For Whom? Government collects taxes from some people and distributes them among other people.

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An aggregate expenditures line, a graphical depiction of the relation between aggregate expenditures and the level of aggregate income or production, can be derived by sequentially adding expenditures by the four macroeconomic sectors (household, business, government, and foreign). This derivation process begins with the consumption line, then adds investment, government purchases, and finally net exports. The process actually generates three alternative aggregate expenditures lines based on the number of sectors included (two sector, three sector, and four sector).

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time looking for the new strip mall out on the highway seeking to buy either a wall poster commemorating the 2000 Olympics or a flower arrangement with a lot of roses for your grandmother. Be on the lookout for celebrities who speak directly to you through your television.
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Francis Bacon (1561-1626), a champion of the scientific method, died when he caught a severe cold while attempting to preserve a chicken by filling it with snow.
"It is not the straining for great things that is most effective; it is the doing of the little things, the common duties, a little better and better."

-- Elizabeth Stuart Phelps, Writer

M2 plus investment types of near monies, including large denomination certificates of deposits, institutional money market deposits, and longer term repurchase agreements and Eurodollars
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