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April 16, 2024 

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CHANGE IN AGGREGATE DEMAND: A shift of the aggregate demand curve caused by a change in one of the aggregate demand determinants. In essence, a change in aggregate demand is caused by any factor affecting aggregate demand EXCEPT the price level. This concept should be contrasted directly with a change in aggregate expenditures. You might also want to review the terms change in quantity demanded and change in demand, as well. The change in aggregate demand is comparable to the change in market demand. A change in aggregate demand is a change in ALL price level-aggregate expenditure combinations, meaning that each price level is matched up with a different aggregate expenditure (which is illustrated as a shift of the aggregate demand curve). This change in aggregate demand is caused by a change in any of the aggregate demand determinants. In contrast, a change in aggregate expenditures is a change from one price level-aggregate expenditure combination to the another (which is illustrated as a movement along a given aggregate demand curve).

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AGGREGATE SUPPLY SHIFTS: Changes in the aggregate supply determinants can shift either the short-run aggregate supply curve and the long-run aggregate supply curve. The mechanism is comparable to that for market supply determinants and market supply. We have two options -- an increase in aggregate supply and a decrease in aggregate supply. An increase in resource quantity or quality or a decrease in resource prices shift the aggregate supply curves to right. A decrease in resource quantity or quality or an increase in resource prices shift the aggregate supply curves to left.

     See also | aggregate supply | aggregate supply determinants | short-run aggregate supply curve | long-run aggregate supply curve | supply determinants | market supply | resource prices | real production | price level | aggregate market |


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AGGREGATE SUPPLY SHIFTS, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2024. [Accessed: April 16, 2024].


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MARGINAL PROPENSITY TO CONSUME

The proportion of each additional dollar of household income that is used for consumption expenditures. The marginal propensity to consume (abbreviated MPC) is another term for the slope of the consumption line and is calculated as the change in consumption divided by the change in income. The MPC plays a central role in Keynesian economics. It quantifies the consumption-income relation and the fundamental psychological law. It is also a foundation for the slope of the aggregate expenditures line and is critical to the multiplier process. A related consumption measure is the average propensity to consume.

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